Posts Tagged: SFU Library

Special reading with Liz Howard, Griffin Award-winning poet

Liz Howard’s Infinite Citizen of the Shaking Tent won the 2016 Griffin Poetry Prize, the first time the prize has been awarded to a debut collection. It was also a finalist for the 2015 Governor General’s Award for Poetry and received an honourable mention for the Alanna Bondar Memorial Book Prize.

Born and raised in northern Ontario, Howard is of Anishinaabe and Franco-Ontarian descent. She received an Honours Bachelor of Science with High Distinction from the University of Toronto, and an MFA in Creative Writing through the University of Guelph. She now lives in Toronto where she assists with neurocognitive aging research.

Liz Howard will be reading in Special Collections & Rare Books (SFU Burnaby) on Friday, March 24th, 2017 from 12:30 – 1:30 pm. Attendance is free and refreshments will be served.

Special Collections is located in room 7100 on the 7th floor of the W.A.C. Bennett Library, Simon Fraser University, 8888 University Drive, Burnaby.


Open Education Week 2017 — The Failure of Access: Rethinking Open Education

In celebration of Open Education Week 2017, Simon Fraser University is honoured to be collaborating with the University of British Columbia, BCcampus, Public Knowledge Project, and British Columbia Research Libraries Group to host a discussion on The Failure of Access: Rethinking Open Education.

Please join us on Tuesday, March 28th at SFU Harbour Centre (515 West Hastings Street, Vancouver, BC) from 5:30pm-8:30pm. This event is open to all and free, but seating is limited and registration is required.

The Failure of Access: Rethinking Open Education

The use of open re-use licenses and Internet technologies have long promised to reduce barriers to education by making it more distributed, equitable, and open. Indeed, the promise of open education can trace its roots to the the Universal Declaration of Human Rights, adopted by the United Nations 1948, which states “everyone has a right to education.” There is little formal evidence, however, that open education has an impact on increasing access to learning or making education more equitable.

This event will explore the goals, failures, and successes of open education. Join us in exploring such questions as: is open education succeeding in being a transformative movement that makes learning more accessible? What are the criteria and successes that should be used to measure if the open education movement is a success? What more needs to be done?

Our discussion will be led by keynote speaker Dr. Ishan Abeywardena (Advisor – Open Education Resources) from the Commonwealth of Learning and panelists from SFU, UBC, CAPER-BC, and SPARC.

Panelists include: Juan Pablo Alperin, Assistant Professor at the Canadian Institute for Studies in Publishing and the Associate Faculty Director of Research with the Public Knowledge Project at Simon Fraser University; Tara Robertson, Accessibility Librarian, CAPER-BC; Jenna Omassi, Strategic Support Advisor, VP Students’ Office at UBC; and moderator Brady Yano, Assistant Director of Open Education, SPARC.

For more information, including full speaker bios and to register, please visit: http://www.lib.sfu.ca/about/branches-depts/rc/32099


Print Culture Speakers Series—Slow Print: William Morris and Socialist Print Culture

Dr. Elizabeth C. Miller will be presenting her talk “Slow Print: William Morris and Socialist Print Culture” in Special Collections and Rare Books on Friday, February 10, as part of the Print Culture Speakers Series. Dr. Miller’s talk will reference items from the Library’s Robert Coupe Collection of works by and about William Morris.

This talk situates William Morris within a flourishing, late-nineteenth-century radical print culture that Miller terms “slow print” due to its purposeful rejection of the strategies of mass print production. While Morris’s work as editor for the Socialist League’s newspaper Commonweal in the 1880s has sometimes been considered at odds with his founding of the Kelmscott Press in the 1890s, the two print adventures are united by a shared goal to reclaim the means of print production from a newly consolidated late-Victorian mass print industry.

Simon Fraser University’s outstanding Morris collection, inclusive of radical ephemera as well as Kelmscott volumes and other examples of fine printing, will be on display in conjunction with the talk so the audience can examine the works for themselves.

• • •

Dr. Elizabeth Miller is professor of English at the University of California at Davis. She is the author of numerous articles and essays on Victorian print culture, radical politics in 19th century England, Oscar Wilde, Alfred, Lord Tennyson, and more recently ecocriticism and Victorian studies. Dr. Miller’s first book, Framed: The New Woman Criminal in British Culture at the Fin de Siècle (University of Michigan, 2008) examined late Victorian crime narratives to understand the figure of the glamorous New Woman criminal.

In Slow Print: Literary Radicalism and Late Victorian Print Culture (Stanford, 2013), Miller explored Britain’s radical press from 1880-1910; Slow Print won the award for best book of the year from the North American Victorian Studies Association and was an honorable mention for the 2014 Modernist Studies Association best book prize. Her newest work is on ecology and capital in 19th century British literature and culture.

This talk will take place on Friday, February 10, 2017 from 2:30 pm – 4:00 pm at W.A.C. Bennett Library [SFU Burnaby], Special Collections and Rare Books, Room 7100.

Free event, no registration required.


Robert R. Reid Exhibition & Curators Talk at SFU Library

SFU Special Collections and Rare Books is pleased to announce the Robert R. Reid: “Allied Arts” Affirmative exhibition produced by the CAUSA Research Curators, and located on the 3rd floor and 7th floor of the W.A.C. Bennett Library (SFU Burnaby) from January–March 2017.

A fifth generation Canadian (b.1927), Robert R. Reid, at age 14, taught himself to operate a ‘hand press’ –so as to channel his absorbing interest in the practicalities of letterpress printing. His subsequent association with architects, landscape designers, poets, graphic artists (and editors for magazines and journals) has become emblematic of a post-WWII ‘Allied Arts’ Movement in Canada. In 1962, he became the first ‘design practitioner’ to be awarded a Canada Council Visual Arts Award.

DATE CHANGED: Join SFU Library on Monday, March 20, 2017, 12:30 to 2:30 pm for a curators talk and reception in Special Collections, Room 7100, W.A.C. Bennett Library. Please email Melanie Hardbattle to RSVP.

The Robert R. Reid: “Allied Arts” Affirmative exhibition presents an assemblage of documents generated between 1949 and 2017. Components of the present exhibition will be intermittently replaced (and/or rearranged), in order to maximize the scope of an exploratory curatorial initiative.


Join poets Stephen Collis & Juliane Okot Bitek for a lunchtime reading

Join SFU Library for a lunchtime poetry reading in Special Collections on Thursday, January 26, 2017.
12:30–1:30pm
Room 7100, 7th floor of the W.A.C. Bennett Library, SFU Burnaby, BC.

Stephen Collis’s most recent, and seventh, book of poetry is Once in Blockadia (Talonbooks 2016). Currently he is visiting and writing about poet Phyllis Webb. He lives on Coast Salish Territories and teaches poetry at Simon Fraser University.

Juliane Okot Bitek was born in Kenya to Ugandan exiles and now lives in Vancouver. A teacher and UBC doctoral candidate in Interdisciplinary Studies, she is also an essayist and poet whose work has been anthologized and published widely in literary magazines, online and in print. Her powerful and critically praised book of poems responding to the Rwandan genocide, 100 Days, was recently published by University of Alberta Press.


One Book One SFU: The Argonauts

SFU Library has announced Maggie Nelson’s The Argonauts as the next pick for One Book One SFU.

one-book-one-sfu

The Argonauts is a genre-bending memoir, a work of ‘autotheory’ offering fresh, fierce, and timely thinking about desire, identity, and the limitations and possibilities of love and language. At its center is a romance: the story of the author’s relationship with the artist Harry Dodge. This story, which includes the author’s account of falling in love with Dodge, who is fluidly gendered, as well as her journey to and through a pregnancy, is an intimate portrayal of the complexities and joys of (queer) family-making.

“Maggie Nelson is one of the most electrifying writers at work in America today, among the sharpest and most supple thinkers of her generation.” —The Guardian

Join the library for an evening of reading and conversation with Maggie Nelson and local author Amber Dawn as they discuss Nelson’s powerful and genre-bending memoir on January 26, 2017 at 7pm.


On writing Robin Blaser’s biography, with Dr. Miriam Nichols

Join the SFU Library for a talk by Miriam Nichols on writing Robin Blaser’s biography on Thursday, November 10.

Dr. Nichols recently completed an edition of Blaser’s The Astonishment Tapes (U. of Alabama Press, 2015), an annotated transcript of a series of autobiographical audio tapes that Blaser recorded in 1974. She is currently working on a literary biography of Blaser (1925-2009), a poet who emerged from the Berkeley Renaissance of the 1940s and ’50s alongside Robert Duncan and Jack Spicer. Blaser was an SFU professor for twenty years after his move to Vancouver in 1966.
The subject of the talk will be about her current work on Blaser’s biography, the dilemma of writing biography, and engaging in archival research.
The talk will be held in Special Collections & Rare Books on November 10, 2016 from 12:30 – 1:30 pm. Special Collections is located in room 7100 on the 7th floor of the W.A.C. Bennett Library, Simon Fraser University, 8888 University Drive, Burnaby.

Dr. Miriam Nichols is an Associate Professor in the Department of English at the University of the Fraser Valley where she teaches modernism, American and Canadian literature, and literary theory. She is an alumnus of SFU English (BA, Hons & M.A.) and received her PhD. from York University.

This event is free to attend. Refreshments will be served.


Call for Submissions: SFU Authors Celebration of 2016 Publications

SFU Library is pleased to invite the SFU community to submit works published during the 2016 calendar year for the 2017 Celebration of SFU Authors.

  • Eligibility Criteria: For more information about this annual celebration and to read the eligibility criteria please visit the event’s website.
  • Submitting Your Work: SFU authors who meet the eligibility criteria are invited to submit their publications via the survey.
  • Deadline: The deadline for submissions is Friday, January 20th, 2017.
  • Contact: If you have any questions, please contact Baharak Yousefi: byousefi@sfu.ca or 778.782.9705.

Reception: The SFU Library will host an exhibit and reception on Thursday, March 9, 2017, 3PM-4:30PM at SFU’s Burnaby Campus to celebrate SFU affiliated authors who published works from January 1, 2016 to December 31, 2016.

Invitations to the 2017 Celebration of SFU Authors will be sent by email to all eligible guests by Feb 8th, 2017.


An Evening with Graphic Journalist Joe Sacco

Join SFU Woodwards for an evening with award-winning graphic journalist Joe Sacco on Wednesday, November 2, 2016 at 7:00 PM.

Joe Sacco is a Maltese-American comic book artist and journalist whose work combines eyewitness reportage and graphic art storytelling techniques. He is the author of Palestine (1996), Footnotes in Gaza (2009), Safe Area Gorazde (2000) and The Fixer (2003). In addition to his 1996 American Book Award, 2001 Guggenheim Fellowship, and 2001 Eisner Award, Sacco’s Footnotes in Gaza was nominated for the 2009 Los Angeles Times Book Prize Graphic Novel award. Sacco was awarded the 2010 Ridenhour Book Prize for Footnotes in Gaza. He was award the 2012 Oregon Book Award for Footnotes in Gaza and 2014 Oregon Book Award Finalist for Journalism.

Sacco will be in conversation with Chris Brayshaw from Pulp Fiction Books, filmmaker Sobhi Al-Zobaidi, and Roxanne Panchasi from SFU’s History Department.

Tickets are $13 and can be purchased online.

Co-presented by SFU’s Vancity Office of Community Engagement, Broken Pencil & Canzine West 2016, SFU History, SFU Library, and the Institute for the Humanities at SFU.


Celebrate Open Access Week 2016

open-access-weekInternational Open Access Week has always been about action, and this year’s theme of “Open in Action” encourages all stakeholders to take concrete steps to make their own work more openly available and encourage others to do the same. From posting pre-prints in a repository to supporting colleagues in making their work more accessible, this year’s Open Access Week will focus on moving from discussion to action in opening up our system for communicating research.

Established by SPARC (the Scholarly Publishing and Academic Resources Coalition) and partners in the student community in 2008, International Open Access Week is an opportunity to take action in making openness the default for research—to raise the visibility of scholarship, accelerate research, and turn breakthroughs into better lives.

Join SFU Library during Open Access Week 2016 for a series of events focused on learning more about and celebrating working in the open!

  • Open Access Authorship & Dissemination (Oct. 24, 1:30pm-3:00pm)
  • Open Research Data (Oct. 26, 10:30am-11:30am)
  • Adopting Open Educational Resources (Oct. 27, 10am-12pm) 
  • Graduate Student Publication (Oct. 27, 10:30am-12:30pm)
  • Featured event: “Reconciling the Needs of Analysis and Advocacy in Scholarly-Communication Reform” & “Open in Action: A panel discussion” (Oct. 25, 9:30am-12pm, SFU Vancouver)

The events are open to all and free, but seating is limited and registration is required. 

For more information and to register, visit: http://tiny.cc/sfu-oa-week