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Subverting the Genre: Connie Walker on Podcasting and Canada’s Missing and Murdered Indigenous Women

As Connie Walker’s hit podcasts, Missing & Murdered—”Who Killed Alberta Williams,” and, “Finding Cleo”—approach the 20 million download mark, we take you behind the stories, into the editorial decision making, and into the struggles behind one of Canada’s most downloaded podcasts. How has the media transformed over the last five years when reporting in Indigenous communities? What is the importance of understanding the role of trauma in our communities in our news and feature stories?

Following a public talk, Connie will be joined by Ryan McMahon, creator, writer, and host of the Thunder Bay podcast, for a Q&A with the audience.

Connie Walker is an award-winning investigative reporter and host of the CBC News podcast, Missing & Murdered. In 2017, “Missing & Murdered: Who killed Alberta Williams?” won the RTDNA’s Adrienne Clarkson Award and was nominated for a Webby Award. Walker and colleagues at the CBC’s Indigenous Unit, won multiple awards including the 2016 Canadian Association of Journalists’ Don McGillivray investigative award, a Canadian Screen Award and the prestigious Hillman Award for its “Missing & Murdered: The Unsolved Cases of Indigenous Women and Girls” interactive website.

Walker is from the Okanese First Nation, in Saskatchewan. She currently lives with her family in Toronto.

This talk is presented as part of the Emerging Leaders in Publishing Summit

As Connie Walker’s hit podcasts, Missing & Murdered—”Who Killed Alberta Williams,” and, “Finding Cleo”—approach the 20 million download mark, we take you behind the stories, into the editorial decision making, and into the struggles behind one of Canada’s most downloaded podcasts. How has the media transformed over the last five years when reporting in Indigenous communities? What is the importance of understanding the role of trauma in our communities in our news and feature stories?

February 13, 2019

7:00pm  to 9:00 pm | Room 100 | Asia Pacific Hall

SFU Centre for Dialogue | 580 West Hastings Street

Admission is free, but reserve your seat through Eventbright


Publishing undergraduate design students exhibition: The Sum of Our Memories

The PUB 431 exhibition explores different facets of memory while investigating the formats of publication and the act of publishing itself, to explore how form and content can affect the experience of reading the material at hand. The exhibition features unique student projects on the theme of memory.

Nostalgic candy will be provided to enhance the experience while supplies last.

Find out more at fb.me/pub431memories

 


Checking In with Each Other in Grad School

A few days ago, the MPubbers who remain in Vancouver completing their professional placements got together after work to have dinner. They took a group photo and hashtagged it “CheckInTuesday.”

And I missed them so much.

Throughout the year, our class, at first led by some of our thoughtful instructors, would have biweekly check-ins. As class began, we would go around the room and talk about how we were doing—not just about what was stressing people out in school, but also about what was going on in our personal and professional lives. From exciting trips to dogs dying, we made it through the year in a large part because we learned how to listen and support each other.

After the check-in practice was modelled for us in class, we began to do it ourselves throughout intensive projects and continue to do it today in our private Facebook group. We may be spread out across the country now, moving in different directions as we tackle new projects, but my fifteen classmates are still the people that get it. Our program is unique and challenging, and I so appreciate having people to talk to and share with.

Grad school can take a serious toll on your mental health, and there are plenty of other articles on that that I’ll leave to the experts. But I did want to share this one simple thing that our class did and that I continue to deeply appreciate.

Remember to check in with your people—it can go a long way.

 


Publishing Unbound: Inclusivity and Accountability in Canadian Publishing

This February, Publishing Unbound is coming to Vancouver (February 9-11, 2018). This event came about as a way to bring together authors, activists, scholars, and publishing professionals in Canada to discuss inclusivity and accountability in the publishing industry.

Over the last year or so, many necessary conversations have taken place in the world known as CanLit. We have talked about the structural role racism, sexism, and colonialism play in the publishing industry; now we need to talk about what concrete steps we can take to change this industry for the better.

Publishing Unbound spans two and a half days, organized in conjunction with the Simon Fraser University Publishing Program’s Emerging Leaders Symposium (a weeklong event which fosters connections between MPub students and industry professionals). It begins on Friday, February 9 with en evening of readings and talks open to the public. Registration for this evening is currently full, but there is a waitlist in case of cancellations.

Speakers on the Friday night panel include Kateri Akiwenzie-Damm, an Anishnaabe writer of mixed ancestry from the Chippewas of Nawash First Nation and founder of Kegedonce Press; David Chariandy, Associate Professor of English literature at Simon Fraser University and 2017 Rogers Writers’ Trust Fiction Prize winner for his novel Brother (McClelland & Stewart); Jordan Abel, a Nisga’a writer from BC pursuing a PhD at Simon Fraser University and the winner of the 2017 Griffin Poetry Prize for his third book, Injun (Talonbooks); and Vivek Shraya, Assistant Professor of English at the University of Calgary, founder of Arsenal Pulp Press’s new VS. Books imprint, and an award-winning artist whose body of work includes several albums, films, and books. The panel will be hosted by Erin Wunker, Assistant Professor of English at Dalhousie University and author of the award-winning Notes from a Feminist Killjoy: Essays on Everyday Life (BookThug).

Assistant Professor in Publishing Dr. Hannah McGregor, who was instrumental in organizing Publishing Unbound, said, “The inspiration for [the event] came when I was trying to add readings to the PUB 800 [Text & Context: Publishing in Contemporary Culture seminar class] syllabus. I was new to the [Master of Publishing] program and I wanted more readings on the syllabus that spoke to race, class, gender, disability, and sexuality.”

She put out a call on Twitter, expecting to be inundated with papers and articles and assuming there was lots of work that she just hadn’t heard of.

Instead, she received an underwhelming number of responses and was struck by the realization that there is a significant gap in publishing studies as a field that speaks to the systemic barriers to access in the industry.

McGregor knew that these conversations were happening on Twitter and through other informal channels, and she wanted to find a way to host these important discussions on a more formal platform. After discussions with Heidi Waechtler of Association of Book Publishers of BC (ABPBC), Sylvia Skene of Magazine Association of BC, and Erin Wunker, Publishing Unbound was born.

While the second day and a half of this event consists of closed roundtable workshops (no audience), Publishing Unbound will be disseminating the results of the discussions to the public at a later date.

For those unable to attend the Friday night session, the event will be recorded and shared publicly.

 


Join Ryan McMahon in a discussion on Indigenizing the Media

February 7, 2018

7:00pm  to 9:00 pm | Room 1430 | Harbour Centre Campus

Admission is free

How do voices from outside the traditional settler mainstream media ensure that they are properly heard and represented? How can new media forms play a role in diversifying and enriching the media landscape? Ryan McMahon, Anishinaabe comedian, writer, media maker & community activator based out of Treaty #1 territory (Winnipeg), will explore these questions and invite the audience to be part of the discussion. 

More information here.


Making your MPub application stand out

If you are considering applying to the Master of Publishing (MPub) program at SFU (and you should), then you have probably come across the Admissions to the MPub Program webpage which details everything you need to include in your application. Admission to the MPub program is highly competitive, and so in this post we’ll share some tips on how you can take your application from good to great.

Statement of Aims and Objectives.
This is perhaps the most intimidating step of the application process, especially if you are uncertain about what you want to do with your degree when you are finished. No matter where you are in your career, you should highlight why you want to apply to the program and what you will bring to it. Also, what brought you here? How does the MPub program fit into your career path? What have you already done, both professionally and academically? What areas of publishing are you interested in? This is the area where you can showcase your passions and personality.

Prerequisite Knowledge
What courses did you take in your undergraduate degree? Get syllabuses from past marketing, accounting, publishing, and Adobe CS courses and to highlight what you have previously learned. Note that the while you should have a basic background in these areas, if you don’t have the exact courses or their equivalents there are other ways to meet the prerequisites before the course begins. You can describe your professional experience in these areas, and just like in a job interview you should expand on your answers with examples of different times you have used different skills and what the result was.

References
Contact people well in advance of the application deadline, and make sure you provide them with background information on the program as well as your future goals so they are able to tailor their answers accordingly. While three references are required, contact a few extra people in case the first people you approach are unavailable. You can also include reference letters in your portfolio.

Portfolio
The portfolio should be a clear demonstration of the skills and abilities you will bring to the Master of Publishing program. Many applicants submit a cover sheet listing the contents of the portfolio and noting how they created or contributed to the creation of the contents. Portfolios can include, but are certainly not limited to: examples of design work, desktop publishing samples, newsletter and/or brochure samples, articles or books (for those who have experience in editing), samples of photography and examples of academic writing. Go for breadth, and show the range of things you’re capable of. If you don’t have many portfolio pieces, you could complete mock projects to submit. Portfolios are to be uploaded to the graduate online application unless previous arrangements have been made with the Program Advisor (ccsp-info@sfu.ca).

Make your application really stand out by branding yourself and using the same design treatment throughout each section. Of course, your application should also be well written and free of errors.

Best of luck, and if you have any further questions that aren’t answered in our FAQs, please contact:

Jo-Anne Ray, Program Advisor

Phone: (778) 782-5242
Fax: (778) 782-5239
Email: ccsp-info@sfu.ca

Address: Program Advisor
Master of Publishing Program
Simon Fraser University Vancouver
515 West Hastings Street, Room 3576
Vancouver, British Columbia
Canada V6B 3K3


The MPub Book Project

While it may be pitched as the most intimidating and largest of projects, looking back on it from the other side, I can assure that the MPub Book Project is more than manageable. Future cohorts take note: you will make it through the next six weeks.

MPub Book Project 2017

The Book Project is a compilation of everything we learned throughout the semester, and so nearly everything you do in the project has already been taught in class. It’s a way of putting things into practice in a mock real world scenario. While the eighteen or so assignments spread out over six weeks sound impossible at first, remember that you are sharing the workload with five or six highly competent classmates, and most of the assignments build on the previous assignments. These assignments are not marked but rather are opportunities for feedback from industry professionals and course instructors who lecture twice a week throughout the project. Read more


Copyediting Position at BC Pension Corporation

COPY EDITOR

Temporary Assignment – Up to Three Months

 

Branch:  Plan and Member Communication Job Type:  Temporary full-time
Classification:  Communications Officer R14 Union/Excluded:  BCGEU
Salary Range:  $45,431 to $51,491 per annum Security Screening:  Yes
Competition:  PC17: Additional:  Funding for relocation will not be provided.
Closing Date:  

 

Geographically Restricted:  Funding for relocation will not be provided.

BC Pension Corporation is one of the largest professional pension services organizations in Canada. Doing meaningful work and with a challenging mandate, we provide comprehensive pension services to five BC public sector pension plans. In addition, the corporation is executing on a forward-thinking, transformational strategy that will change the way we serve plan members and employers. Our strategic plan, From 12 to 21, is an ambitious program of business transformation that supports high service levels and cost-effective delivery through better use of technology, improved business process and continued attention to staff training and development. It’s the ideal setting for a consultative team player who thrives in a collegial, results-oriented client service delivery environment.

Reporting to the Manager, Communications, the Copy Editor edits and proofs communication products to ensure clarity and standardization. Communication products can be complex, controversial and sensitive in nature. The potential for content to be miscommunicated may have a negative impact on the Pension Corporation and exacerbate sensitive circumstances and cause embarrassment to the Corporation. The Copy Editor provides feedback to the writer on all aspects of the written product. The position must establish strong relationships with all levels of staff across the Corporation. 

Selection Criteria:

  • Diploma in a related field such as communications or journalism or an equivalent combination of related education, training and experience.
  • A minimum of two years’ editing and proof reading or related experience which encompasses multiple communication channels and products suitable for the level of the position.
  • Experience using computer applications including MS Office, Excel, Outlook, Adobe and in internet researching.
  • Experience with the Chicago Manual of Style.

Your resume must provide detailed information about your education and employment history in order to clearly demonstrate how you meet the required job qualifications as listed in the selection criteria above. Please ensure your resume includes the month and year(s) for each job in your employment history as well as the job related responsibilities.

Lesser qualified applicants may be appointed at a lower level.  An eligibility list may be established. Testing may be required.  

Only applicants selected to move forward in the recruitment process will be contacted to move to the next stage (at-home written assessment and/or an interview).  All candidates are notified of the outcome of the competition once it has been completed.

To apply:

Please apply through our career websitehttps://bcpensioncorp.prevueaps.ca/jobs/

 Contact: Human Resources

                Email: Jobs@pensionsbc.ca

PDF available: Copy Editor JD