Publishing@SFU Announcements

Introducing Dr. Amanda Lastoria, the First Publishing PhD in North America

Dr. Amanda Lastoria’s PhD Defence at SFU Vancouver Harbour Centre on The Material Evolution of Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland: How Book Design and Production Values Impact the Markets for and the Meanings of the Text

Amanda Lastoria has earned North America’s first Ph.D. in Publishing (Simon Fraser University). She also holds an MA in Publishing (Oxford Brookes University), a BA in French/Arts and Culture (SFU) and a Diploma in Arts Management (University of London). Amanda’s research is critically informed by more than a decade of professional experience in the publishing industry. She has worked as an in-house employee and freelance contractor in a variety of roles, from production editor and production controller to copyeditor and proofreader to business manager and associate publisher. Amanda has worked on, for example, academic books, an online educational platform, an arts magazine, general interest ebooks and high-end trade books for companies in England, America and Canada. Her employers and clients have included both independent and multi-national houses like The Folio Society, Taylor & Francis/Routledge, Macmillan, and Random House, as well as self-publishers, a start-up imprint and a non-profit organization. Amanda is also former Editor of Lewis Carroll Review, and she has developed the standard list of titles for John Tenniel’s iconic Alice illustrations. Amanda is currently the Regional Liaison Officer to Canada for the Society for the History of Authorship, Reading and Publishing (SHARP).

On November 13, 2019, Dr. Amanda Lastoria successfully defended her interdisciplinary doctoral research, which explores the materiality of the book and the “material evolution” of the title. Lastoria uses multiple editions of a single title – Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland – as a case study through which she develops a critical understanding of the title’s positions in the market on the one hand, and the ways in which design and production values contribute to the creation of meaning on the other hand.

Addressing what she sees as a “lack of scholarship that rigorously investigates the look and feel of the book,” Lastoria analyzes 46 editions of Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland, tracing 150 years of the title’s “material evolution” through Anglo-American markets.

Using a combination of methods and tools – bibliography, book history, publishing history and literary theory – Lastoria documents, historicizes and interrogates the book’s power as a commodity. Lastoria takes us on a journey as we follow Alice through the title’s many incarnations and learn of the ways in which the design and production values are at once an echo and an aberration of Lewis Carroll’s original art direction. Lastoria concludes, “Alice, like all books, ought to be judged by its cover – and its paper, typography, ink, bind, endpapers, dustjacket and so forth” so that we can better understand “how the book targets a market and encodes a meaning.”

With gratitude, acknowledgements for this esteemed accomplishment go to Lastoria’s supervisors:  Prof. John Maxwell, Publishing; Prof. Michael Everton, English; and Prof. Stuart Poyntz, Communication; and to her examiners: Prof. Teal Triggs, Graphic Design, Royal College of Art; Prof. Michelle Levy, English.

–    –    –

If you’re interested in getting the kind of education in publishing that allows you to dive deep into the history of publishing, or develop a scholarship that is as playful as it is rigorous, consider applying for the Master of Publishing Program at Simon Fraser University before February 1st.


Biking to Publishing School

Bikes at SFU Harbour Centre

There are a lot of good reasons to cycle: it’s good for the planet, it’s good for cities and their congestion problems, and it’s good for you. We thought to take a look at cycling in the MPub program: why we do it and how we do it, and maybe we’ll encourage you to do it too!

Half the Publishing faculty are regular cycle commuters, and a good (though variable) number of students are too. Those of us who do ride know that it’s the best way to get around, for a number of reasons.

Why cycle?

Vancouver’s cycling infrastructure has developed hugely over the past half-dozen years,1 and there are good cycle routes through most of the city. The number of cyclists has grown accordingly, which is good not just for the planet, but also because more cyclists on the road makes cycling safer, as the people in Copenhagen and Amsterdam know well.

Commuting by bike is well established by research2 as one of the single best things you can do for your health. It also has the advantage of not taking up extra time in your day. You could take the bus and then take time to go to the gym; or you could just ride your bike!

Regular exercise is good for your heart and lungs of course, but it’s also very good for your head, which is especially helpful for students in the Vancouver winter—which tends to wet and dark as opposed to cold and snowy. Getting into a regular routine of riding every day gets your blood pumping, opens up your sinuses, and gives you an outlet for the stresses that otherwise pile up when we live and work indoors. Additionally, many of us find that commuting by bike gives a sense of agency and control that we miss when we’re dependent on transit schedules and crowds. Emma (MPub 2017) notes, “Have you ever been trapped on an overcrowded bus on a rainy day? Once you get your rain routine down, you will choose cycling over transit no matter the weather.”

Don’t I need special clothing?

You really don’t. While it sometimes seems like cyclists have to invest in a fluorescent lyrca outfit, this isn’t actually the case. You can totally commute in your regular clothes. Of course some clothes are going to be more comfortable than others, but you do not need fancy gear.

In Vancouver, you probably do need some waterproofing, at least if you’re going to ride on rainy days. You’ll need a good raincoat (one with pit-zips help with the internal humidity), a pair of waterproof rain pants, and a pair of gloves–the sum of which make you feel kind of invincible on a rainy day! But that’s about all you really need. And if it isn’t raining, you don’t even need those.

Won’t I get sweaty?

SFU’s Harbour Centre Campus is, as the name suggests, near the water downtown, so it’s downhill from almost everywhere – which means sweat likely isn’t a big problem on your way to school. Some of us like to bring a change of shirt and socks in our bags. Depending on where you live, you may have to go uphill to get home, so you’re more likely to sweat at the end of the day than the beginning. And if you want to get a little sweaty—and ride for the sake of it—SFU Harbour Centre has great access to the Stanley Park Seawall.

Everything inside the circle on this map is probably within a half-hour bike ride from Harbour Centre Campus. Plus, within this circle, you are almost certainly faster than buses and cars, which can’t get through traffic effectively. You can have a look at Vancouver’s cycle routes by turning on that layer on Google Maps, or by checking out the City of Vancouver’s website. We all like to share our tips about the best ways to get around the city: which routes are the flattest, quietest, prettiest… and so on.

I don’t even have a (good) bike!

This is solvable on a number of levels. First, Vancouver has, per capita, the most bike shops in Canada.3 Second, excellent community resources like Our Community Bikes and Kickstand offer really inexpensive, accessible refurbished bikes and repair service. There are also cheap bikes available on Craigslist, online marketplaces, or pawn shops. Vancouver has also implemented the Mobi bike rental system, where you can pickup and drop off bikes at convenient spots all over town. You’re never far from a shop or an available bike, really.

You don’t need a fancy bike; they’re theft targets anyway. What you need is a bike with at least three gears and working brakes. You do need a good lock, because university campuses are always bike theft magnets. At Harbour Centre there is also a bicycle lock-up room to which, with your student card, you can get a key. 

But is it safe?

Yes, but you have to be thoughtful about it, and to know and anticipate the risks.

For starters you need lights! A good front light (white) and a red one for the rear help you see and be seen on the road after dark. Lights are an essential, mandatory bit of safety kit—and which go nicely with reflective strips, panels, and bits of clothing. A reflective safety vest can be had pretty cheaply and may make you feel a good deal more visible on a dark, wet evening. 

By law you need a helmet, which, if nothing else, can also provide some protection from the rain. A ball cap under your helmet helps keep the rain off your glasses.

Vancouver’s bike lanes and paths—the fully separated ones and the painted-on ones—make cycling through the city much safer. But even the streets you share with cars are better now than they used to be, because the number of cyclists has risen, and so bikes are a normal part of everyday traffic in the city. 

Knowing how to ride safely is important too. Using proper hand signals when turning, being visible, and being polite and clear when passing people makes a big difference. This is about co-existing with cars but also about co-existing with other cyclists, especially in the warmer months when bikes almost seem to outnumber cars at certain intersections. 

And if you don’t feel like biking back home because you’re leaving campus really late at night after working on Book Project 😉 the bus or skytrain will allow you to bring your bike on board!

Learning more about cycling in Vancouver

There are a number of advocacy groups in the city, such as Hub Cycling, who organize the twice-annual bike-to-work-week events. The City itself is relatively pro-active. And of course every bike shop in town also advocates for cycling more generally.

Here in Publishing@SFU, we have a strong cycling culture of our own, which we like to promote (which is why you’re reading this now). We love to share our ideas about bikes and gear and riding, and our love for People’s Poncho cycling capes, Vessi waterproof footwear, Sidesaddle, a women-focused bike shop, and more. We like to trade info about bike routes and the best ways to get around. And we like to egg each other on to ride in wetter, darker weather each winter 🙂 Get in touch! 

Thanks to Mauve Pagé, Avvai Ketheeswaran, Alice Fleerackers, Emma Walter. and Leanne Johnson for their input into this article!


  1. https://vancouver.ca/streets-transportation/biking.aspx↩︎
  2. See, for example, this 2016 review article https://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/01441647.2015.1057877↩︎
  3. https://www.pembina.org/reports/cycle-cities-full-report-rev.pdf↩︎

Dr. Juan Pablo Alperin Delivers Opening Keynote at the UN Library

Dr. Juan Pablo Alperin delivered an opening keynote at the United Nations Library Conference, “Towards Global Open Science: Core Enabler of the UN 2030 Agenda” on November 19, 2019.

Juan is an Assistant Professor in the Publishing Program and Associate Director of Research with the Public Knowledge Project at Simon Fraser University. In his work, he uses computational techniques, surveys, and interviews to investigate ways of raising the scientific quality, global impact, and public use of scholarly work. He’s been invited to present on the theme of global open science at the first United Nations Open Science Conference, which is organized by the UN Dag Hammarskjöld Library in collaboration with the Scholarly Publishing and Academic Resources Coalition (SPARC). 

The conference “Towards Global Open Science” brings together representatives of open science initiatives (OpenAIREHindawiLA ReferenciaAfricanLII and others), early career researchers, library directors and policymakers. The intention is to elevate the discussion about open science and open research to the global level and to examine the role of open science in advancing the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development,

Openness is an essential component of the scientific process. With the fundamental changes technology is bringing to scholarly communication, the principle of openness should be reinforced to become a core element of the research cycle.

From the Conference Concept Note

Watch the live webcast on UN Web TV
Link will be live 15 minutes before the conference starts. Works best in Internet Explorer.

Follow the discussion on Twitter @UNLibrary on Twitter #OpenScienceUN


Dr Teal Triggs on Katy Keene Fandom: Zines and the Politics of Participation – Nov 14th

4pm Thursday, November 14th, at Emily Carr University

Katy Keene Fandom: Zines and the Politics of Participation
Reliance Theatre at Emily Carr University
Thursday, November 14, 4 pm
Followed by a reception at READ Books

Please join us at Emily Carr University in the Reliance Theatre for a talk by Dr Teal Triggs.

This talk will present the comic book world of Katy Keene (1945-1961), a unique American character created by Bill Woggon.

Katy Keene made her debut in 1945, and today forms part of a history of comic strips written about independent career women. Although drawn to reflect the fashionable female image of America’s fifties post-war period – less exotic ‘pin-up’, rather ‘girl-next-door’ – this character exhibited the ambition and drive to make it as a successful career woman. As such, Katy Keene became the focus of a loyal fan club and pen pals, with merchandising to match, and whose clothes, houses, and cars were created by the fans themselves.

Triggs will explore the resurgence of interest in the character in the 1980’s fueled by the creation of the fanzine Katy Keene Fan Magazine by Craig Leavitt and discuss the way in which her creator and the fanzine editor, broke down the barriers between themselves and their fans; a number of whom who went on to become successful illustrators, designers, and writers in their own right.


Teal Triggs is Professor of Graphic Design in the School of Communication, Royal College of Art, London. As a graphic design historian, critic and educator her writings have appeared in numerous edited books and international design publications. Her research focuses primarily on design pedagogy, criticism, self-publishing. She is Associate Editor of Design Issues (MIT Press) and was founding Editor-in-Chief of Communication Design (Taylor & Francis/ico-D). Her recent books include: co-editor of The Graphic Design Reader (Bloomsbury), author of Fanzines (Thames & Hudson)and the children’s book The School of Art (Wide Eyed). She is a Fellow of the International Society of Typographic Designers, Royal College of Art and, Royal Society for the Encouragement of Arts, Manufactures and Commerce.

This event is presented by Publishing @ SFU in partnership with the Vancouver Art Book Fair, Graphic Research Group, READ Books and Emily Carr University of Art + Design. Thanks too for the support of SFU’s Faculty of Communication, Art, and Technology.



Subverting the Genre: Connie Walker on Podcasting and Canada’s Missing and Murdered Indigenous Women

As Connie Walker’s hit podcasts, Missing & Murdered—”Who Killed Alberta Williams,” and, “Finding Cleo”—approach the 20 million download mark, we take you behind the stories, into the editorial decision making, and into the struggles behind one of Canada’s most downloaded podcasts. How has the media transformed over the last five years when reporting in Indigenous communities? What is the importance of understanding the role of trauma in our communities in our news and feature stories?

Following a public talk, Connie will be joined by Ryan McMahon, creator, writer, and host of the Thunder Bay podcast, for a Q&A with the audience.

Connie Walker is an award-winning investigative reporter and host of the CBC News podcast, Missing & Murdered. In 2017, “Missing & Murdered: Who killed Alberta Williams?” won the RTDNA’s Adrienne Clarkson Award and was nominated for a Webby Award. Walker and colleagues at the CBC’s Indigenous Unit, won multiple awards including the 2016 Canadian Association of Journalists’ Don McGillivray investigative award, a Canadian Screen Award and the prestigious Hillman Award for its “Missing & Murdered: The Unsolved Cases of Indigenous Women and Girls” interactive website.

Walker is from the Okanese First Nation, in Saskatchewan. She currently lives with her family in Toronto.

This talk is presented as part of the Emerging Leaders in Publishing Summit

As Connie Walker’s hit podcasts, Missing & Murdered—”Who Killed Alberta Williams,” and, “Finding Cleo”—approach the 20 million download mark, we take you behind the stories, into the editorial decision making, and into the struggles behind one of Canada’s most downloaded podcasts. How has the media transformed over the last five years when reporting in Indigenous communities? What is the importance of understanding the role of trauma in our communities in our news and feature stories?

February 13, 2019

7:00pm  to 9:00 pm | Room 100 | Asia Pacific Hall

SFU Centre for Dialogue | 580 West Hastings Street

Admission is free, but reserve your seat through Eventbright


Dr Juan Alperin awarded Open Scholarship Award 2018

The Canadian Social Knowledge Institute has awarded Publishing@SFU’s Dr Juan Alperin their Open Scholarship Award for 2018, in honour of Dr Alperin’s many contributions to open scholarship and open access in his research and long-time contributions to the Public Knowledge Project (PKP).

The PKP blog has a nice write-up on it: https://pkp.sfu.ca/2018/04/16/pkps-juan-pablo-alperin-receives-open-scholarship-award

 

 


The MPub Book Project

While it may be pitched as the most intimidating and largest of projects, looking back on it from the other side, I can assure that the MPub Book Project is more than manageable. Future cohorts take note: you will make it through the next six weeks.

MPub Book Project 2017

The Book Project is a compilation of everything we learned throughout the semester, and so nearly everything you do in the project has already been taught in class. It’s a way of putting things into practice in a mock real world scenario. While the eighteen or so assignments spread out over six weeks sound impossible at first, remember that you are sharing the workload with five or six highly competent classmates, and most of the assignments build on the previous assignments. These assignments are not marked but rather are opportunities for feedback from industry professionals and course instructors who lecture twice a week throughout the project. Read more


Copyediting Position at BC Pension Corporation

COPY EDITOR

Temporary Assignment – Up to Three Months

 

Branch:  Plan and Member Communication Job Type:  Temporary full-time
Classification:  Communications Officer R14 Union/Excluded:  BCGEU
Salary Range:  $45,431 to $51,491 per annum Security Screening:  Yes
Competition:  PC17: Additional:  Funding for relocation will not be provided.
Closing Date:  

 

Geographically Restricted:  Funding for relocation will not be provided.

BC Pension Corporation is one of the largest professional pension services organizations in Canada. Doing meaningful work and with a challenging mandate, we provide comprehensive pension services to five BC public sector pension plans. In addition, the corporation is executing on a forward-thinking, transformational strategy that will change the way we serve plan members and employers. Our strategic plan, From 12 to 21, is an ambitious program of business transformation that supports high service levels and cost-effective delivery through better use of technology, improved business process and continued attention to staff training and development. It’s the ideal setting for a consultative team player who thrives in a collegial, results-oriented client service delivery environment.

Reporting to the Manager, Communications, the Copy Editor edits and proofs communication products to ensure clarity and standardization. Communication products can be complex, controversial and sensitive in nature. The potential for content to be miscommunicated may have a negative impact on the Pension Corporation and exacerbate sensitive circumstances and cause embarrassment to the Corporation. The Copy Editor provides feedback to the writer on all aspects of the written product. The position must establish strong relationships with all levels of staff across the Corporation. 

Selection Criteria:

  • Diploma in a related field such as communications or journalism or an equivalent combination of related education, training and experience.
  • A minimum of two years’ editing and proof reading or related experience which encompasses multiple communication channels and products suitable for the level of the position.
  • Experience using computer applications including MS Office, Excel, Outlook, Adobe and in internet researching.
  • Experience with the Chicago Manual of Style.

Your resume must provide detailed information about your education and employment history in order to clearly demonstrate how you meet the required job qualifications as listed in the selection criteria above. Please ensure your resume includes the month and year(s) for each job in your employment history as well as the job related responsibilities.

Lesser qualified applicants may be appointed at a lower level.  An eligibility list may be established. Testing may be required.  

Only applicants selected to move forward in the recruitment process will be contacted to move to the next stage (at-home written assessment and/or an interview).  All candidates are notified of the outcome of the competition once it has been completed.

To apply:

Please apply through our career websitehttps://bcpensioncorp.prevueaps.ca/jobs/

 Contact: Human Resources

                Email: Jobs@pensionsbc.ca

PDF available: Copy Editor JD


The Inaugural Jim Douglas Lecture: Marion Sinclair of Publishing Scotland

In September 2016, the great British Columbia publisher James Jardine Douglas passed away in North Vancouver. Jim Douglas — known perhaps most famously as the “Douglas” in Douglas & McIntyre — was one of the most influential and inspirational figures in BC publishing. A number of key publishing firms in BC — including D&M, Raincoast Books, Ampersand & Co — trace their lineage in one way or another to Jim Douglas. And a great many people in the BC industry have known, worked with, and been encouraged by Jim. The Publishing Program at SFU owes an enormous debt to Jim, as he contributed so much of his time, wisdom, and indeed money to the establishment of our program and the encouragement of our students and faculty.

To recognize Jim’s great contributions to the BC publishing industry, we are pleased to announce the Jim Douglas Lecture, an annual event which aims to bring the local publishing community together and to highlight issues of importance.

The first Jim Douglas Lecture will be held on Wednesday, September 20th at 7pm, at SFU Harbour Centre (rm 1400).

Our inaugural speaker is Marion Sinclair, currently Chief Executive of Publishing Scotland and with 28 years experience in the Scottish publishing industry. Ms Sinclair will speak to us about “Scottish Publishing Today and its Place in the World,” a subject with very clear parallels in Canadian independent publishing.

We hope you will join us on the evening of September 20th, to honour Jim’s memory, and to meet our very distinguished guest.

For more about Jim Douglas, BC Booklook published an excellent remembrance:

For more about Marion Sinclair’s Publishing Scotland, see http://www.publishingscotland.org/

For additional information or to reserve a seat, please email: pubworks@sfu.ca

 

 


css.php