News & Events

Magazine Project Presentations

The 2016 MPub cohort and professors

The 2016 cohort has now dispersed to begin the personal projects or internships that they will be writing their project reports on. Students are spread across Canada, working at small presses like Arsenal Pulp and Anvil, large houses like Scholastic and Penguin Random House, literary and lifestyle magazines, content marketing agencies, and non-profits that are building new models and technology for publishing. But before they left, the cohort presented their magazine projects to their classmates and some members of the publishing community. This year the magazine project was combined with the tech project, to expand upon the digital possibilities of marrying print and tech, and to explore the future of magazine publishing in a digital world.

The groups presented to three panelists: Anicka Quin, Editorial Director of Western Living and Van Mag; Michal Kozlowski, Publisher of Geist; and Joanna Riquett, Founder & Editor-in-Chief of Hayo Magazine. The three panelists weighed in on all aspects of the business plans and presentations, including the editorial tone and voice, circulation strategy, financial statements, and digital strategy.

Somata magazine coverThe first magazine to present was Somata, a charmingly-offbeat food culture magazine that encourages you to “play with your food.” They kicked things off with a rousing game of “Mission Statement Mad Libs” which set the tone for their editorial style. They went into detail about their irreverent tone, events-based funding model, digital-first strategy, and in-depth social media plan in a lively presentation which included a PowerPoint that featured many gifs.

Boundless magazine coverNext, Boundless, “the magazine for women wanderers” detailed how they planned to target backpackers as their main audience and differentiate themselves from other more luxury-focused travel magazines. They cited how millennials travel less often, but for longer periods of time, and crave immersive cultural experiences. While they are a print magazine, they have a thorough digital strategy, particularly with creating brand awareness on Instagram.

START magazine coverLastly, START is a not-for-profit digital magazine that both serves and supports the emerging artist community in Canada. With a focus on art students, they provide an online space for a community of tomorrow’s artists to connect and communicate. Featuring webinars of art skills or career tips, spotlights on recent gallery openings, and a user submitted gallery of art, essays, classifieds, and events, START wants to be as indispensable to artists as sketchbooks.

The presentations made for a day full of entertainment and education, and each of the magazines illustrated the breadth of interest and experience of its group members, and of the MPub itself. This included the different ways publishers are using technology–from entirely digital first strategies to using social media to create brand engagement and awareness. And after the presentation, the cohort mingled with our valued industry guests, and looked towards bright futures in an evolving publishing landscape.


Journal collection development in the digital era

Created in the second half of the 17th Century, journals became the fastest and most convenient way of disseminating new research results, outranking correspondence and monographs. The advent of the digital era then challenged their traditional role and form. Indeed, digital technologies, which are easy to update, reuse, access, and transmit, have changed how researchers produce and disseminate knowledge, as well as how this knowledge is accessed, used, and cited. It also changed how libraries subscribe to scholarly content.

Drawing on historical and contemporary empirical data, this talk will address the past and current transformations of scholarly communication, with an emphasis on the role of journals in this new ecosystem, and present the results of the first large-scale analysis of journal usage in Canada.

About the speaker

Vincent Larivière holds the Canada Research Chair on the Transformations of Scholarly Communication at the Université de Montréal, where he is associate professor of information science. He is also scientific director of the Érudit journal platform, associate scientific director of the Observatoire des sciences et des technologies (OST) and regular member of the Centre interuniversitaire de recherche sur la science et la technologie (CIRST).

Vincent holds a bachelor’s in Science, Technology and Society (UQAM), a master’s degree in history of science (UQAM) and a Ph.D. in information science (McGill), for which he received the 2009 Eugene Garfield Dissertation Scholarship award.

April 10, 3pm-4:30pm at the Halpern Centre, room 126 (SFU Burnaby)

Please RSVP to library@sfu.ca

Sponsored by KEY, SFU’s Big Data Initiative, and SFU Library

Ralph Hancox, 23 August 1929 – 22 March 2017

We are mourning the loss of Ralph Hancox, noted Canadian editor, publishing icon and former Chairman of Reader’s Digest Canada, and one of the founders of the Master of Publishing Program at SFU.

Victoria, British Columbia – 26 March 2017 – The family announces the recent death of Ralph Hancox, latterly from Victoria, British Columbia, on 22 March 2017 at the fine age of 87.

Colleagues and friends refer to Ralph as a remarkable man of letters, of sharp wit and humour, a classic gentleman. He was one who willingly pushed a car out of a snow bank, helped others in formative stages to launch executive careers, held court with an audience and shared sage advice and counsel. The legacy he leaves behind with colleagues, students and family is the gift of using the written word to entertain and improve the lives of those who remain.

Ralph was born in West Hamstead, England on 23 August 1929. Ralph attended the School of Modern Languages, Regent Street Polytechnic in London, where he mastered Pitman shorthand, a prerequisite skill for his early career in journalism. He arrived in Canada in 1955 with his new bride, Margaret (Peg) Frier, newborn daughter Linda and a vintage German Olympia typewriter in hand. His exceptional typing skills of 125 wpm, his sharp and inquisitive mind were tools that launched an iconic career in journalism that spanned 54 years on the Canadian publishing landscape.

Ralph started his career as a pilot in the Royal Air Force, training in Rhodesia, at the tender age of 17. He described the experience of flying the Tiger Moth, Harvard, and the first RAF jet, the Gloster Meteor as “hurtling through the air in a tin can with a ton of metal strapped to his backside.” He flew in the Berlin Airlift in 1948, and later as a journalist covered the building of the Berlin Wall. In 1961, he travelled via the underground from East to West Berlin through the Wall under the conditions that he would not report on his experience.

In 1965, Ralph won a Nieman Fellowship recognizing excellence in Canadian editorial writing at the Peterborough Examiner and attended Harvard’s Nieman Foundation for Journalism. Later he joined Harvard’s Program for Management Development as part of the PMD 26 cohort at the School of Business.

In Canada he started his career in journalism writing obituaries for the Kingston Whig Standard. After a career as Editor-in-Chief at the Peterborough Examiner as a colleague of Robertson Davies, he joined the Reader’s Digest where he worked for 32 years. Ralph ended his first career, serving the last 16 years as Chairman, President, and CEO of Reader’s’ Digest Canada and Consigliere delegato and chairman of Reader’s Digest Italy. Post retirement he served as Adjunct Professor and Professional Fellow Emeritus at Simon Fraser University where he published a textbook on Managing the Publishing Process for the Canadian Centre for Studies in Publishing. There, he was honoured with the Chancellor’s Award for Distinguished Service for 10 years of teaching before he retired again at the age of 80, in 2009.

Peg and Ralph (aka Hank) lived a life post-World War II in Canada pursuing family and career dreams in Kingston, Peterborough, Boston, New York, Montreal, Milan, Vancouver, and Victoria, with summers at Sandy Lake and weekends of leisure in Vermont. He was inquisitive and over the years Ralph pursued his passion in photography, choral music, madrigals, travelling the world, writing and publishing seven books exploring topics of social conscience, family history and publishing management. Simple pleasures included sautéing the perfect scallop, bird and wildlife watching. A storyteller at heart, he regaled generations of family and students with lessons he learned from his rich life experiences. “Good judgment comes from experience and experience comes from poor judgement” he would say, quoting his mother.

He was a man of letters in the classic sense: fountain pen, elegant italic script to paper and daily journaling over the last 53 years. He engaged in written repartees, Olympian literary gymnastics with family and friends, including long time Peterborough friend and librarian, Bob Porter.

He was not an ordinary man. Robert Frost’s words “I had a lover’s quarrel with the world” describes the restless soul, the intimate relationships, the daily inner tension, his ability to question and think deeply and at the same time embrace his life. His mind never rested as he explored life and the meaning of existence, to the day he died.

Ralph leaves behind 4 appreciative children, their spouses and families who live with gratitude across Canada.

 

RALPH HANCOX, 23 August 1929—22 March 2017


Master of Publishing students final magazine media presentations – April 7th

Join SFU’s Master of Publishing students as they present their final magazine media projects.
This year we have combined the tech and magazine projects to expand upon the digital possibilities in marrying print and tech. Our students have created their own “maga” projects that explore the digital possibilities of magazine publishing today.

Friday, April 7th in room 2270 and running from 1:30 to 4:30.

 


Special reading with Liz Howard, Griffin Award-winning poet

Liz Howard’s Infinite Citizen of the Shaking Tent won the 2016 Griffin Poetry Prize, the first time the prize has been awarded to a debut collection. It was also a finalist for the 2015 Governor General’s Award for Poetry and received an honourable mention for the Alanna Bondar Memorial Book Prize.

Born and raised in northern Ontario, Howard is of Anishinaabe and Franco-Ontarian descent. She received an Honours Bachelor of Science with High Distinction from the University of Toronto, and an MFA in Creative Writing through the University of Guelph. She now lives in Toronto where she assists with neurocognitive aging research.

Liz Howard will be reading in Special Collections & Rare Books (SFU Burnaby) on Friday, March 24th, 2017 from 12:30 – 1:30 pm. Attendance is free and refreshments will be served.

Special Collections is located in room 7100 on the 7th floor of the W.A.C. Bennett Library, Simon Fraser University, 8888 University Drive, Burnaby.


Open Education Week 2017 — The Failure of Access: Rethinking Open Education

In celebration of Open Education Week 2017, Simon Fraser University is honoured to be collaborating with the University of British Columbia, BCcampus, Public Knowledge Project, and British Columbia Research Libraries Group to host a discussion on The Failure of Access: Rethinking Open Education.

Please join us on Tuesday, March 28th at SFU Harbour Centre (515 West Hastings Street, Vancouver, BC) from 5:30pm-8:30pm. This event is open to all and free, but seating is limited and registration is required.

The Failure of Access: Rethinking Open Education

The use of open re-use licenses and Internet technologies have long promised to reduce barriers to education by making it more distributed, equitable, and open. Indeed, the promise of open education can trace its roots to the the Universal Declaration of Human Rights, adopted by the United Nations 1948, which states “everyone has a right to education.” There is little formal evidence, however, that open education has an impact on increasing access to learning or making education more equitable.

This event will explore the goals, failures, and successes of open education. Join us in exploring such questions as: is open education succeeding in being a transformative movement that makes learning more accessible? What are the criteria and successes that should be used to measure if the open education movement is a success? What more needs to be done?

Our discussion will be led by keynote speaker Dr. Ishan Abeywardena (Advisor – Open Education Resources) from the Commonwealth of Learning and panelists from SFU, UBC, CAPER-BC, and SPARC.

Panelists include: Juan Pablo Alperin, Assistant Professor at the Canadian Institute for Studies in Publishing and the Associate Faculty Director of Research with the Public Knowledge Project at Simon Fraser University; Tara Robertson, Accessibility Librarian, CAPER-BC; Jenna Omassi, Strategic Support Advisor, VP Students’ Office at UBC; and moderator Brady Yano, Assistant Director of Open Education, SPARC.

For more information, including full speaker bios and to register, please visit: http://www.lib.sfu.ca/about/branches-depts/rc/32099


Publishing PhD candidate Amanda Lastoria presents talk on Alice in Wonderland

Amanda Lastoria is Canada’s first PhD candidate in Publishing (SFU) and editor of the Lewis Carroll Review. Her research interrogates the ways in which the book’s design and production values impact the markets for, and the meanings of, the text.

Amanda will be presenting a talk titled Alice by Design: The Victorian Material Evolution of Wonderland as part of SFU English Department’s Print Culture Speakers Series on Friday, March 10 at SFU Burnaby campus.

The Print Culture Speakers Series has been a venue for the dissemination of innovative work and discussion of the issues that challenge and define the study of print culture by bringing scholars together with local faculty, graduate students, and undergraduate students.

Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland, first published by Macmillan in 1865 and republished in numerous Victorian editions, was written and art directed by Lewis Carroll. Each repackaging of the title targets a different consumer of the book and solicits a different response to the story. This talk (based on a paper Lastoria wrote) traces the development of early editions from initial concepts to final products, reflecting on their creative success—as qualified by Carroll and critics—and commercial success—as quantified by the market.Wonderland is a case study of the origins and effects of material evolution.

The book’s design and production values, such as cover design, paper stock and binding method, constitute its materiality; the multiple materialities of a title that is republished in a number of editions, or repackagings, constitute what this paper calls the title’s material evolution. How is the title materially differentiated from one edition to the next? What is the impact of each edition? Body text and illustrations are mutable content that is framed and commodified by the book’s materiality, and, by extension, the title’s material evolution. Analyzing multiple editions of a single title isolates the variable of editorial content and throws into relief its evolving material contexts.

Alice by Design: The Victorian Material Evolution of Wonderland
Friday, March 10, 2017
2:30-4:00pm
AQ 6106, SFU Burnaby campus


Nominations for inaugural Karen Virag Award now open

Each year, Editors Canada presents several awards recognizing excellence in editing and service to the organization. Editors Canada’s newest award was created in memory of long-time association member Karen Virag, and in recognition of Karen’s many contributions to the profession.

The Karen Virag Award recognizes the efforts of an editor or an organization to raise the profile of editing in their community.

A nominee’s contribution may take a variety of forms, including one or more of the following:

  • writing;
  • public speaking;
  • teaching;
  • participating in broadcast or new media; and
  • sponsoring editing-related activities and community building in Canada and abroad.

The award recipient will be recognized at the annual Editors Canada conference in Ottawa–Gatineau in June 2017, and will receive a commemorative plaque.

Nominations for the inaugural Karen Virag Award are now open. For complete nomination instructions and other information about the award, visit the Karen Virag Award page. Deadline for nominations is Friday, April 7, 2017.


Introducing the Digital Humanities Café

The DH Café presents a series of short introductory workshops and informal discussion on topics relevant to the basic theories and methods behind digital research in the humanities. The courses cover a broad range of topics, from larger issues in digital research in the academy to specific tools and research techniques.
The DH Café is a partnership between the Digital Humanities Innovation Lab (DHIL) and SFU Library’s Research Commons. The DH Café is also affiliated with KEY, SFU’s Big Data Initiative.
Beginning March 1st and running until April 5th, the DH Café will meet Wednesday afternoons from 3pm – 4pm, alternating between SFU Burnaby and SFU Vancouver (see individual workshops to confirm location).  Workshops can be hosted at other locations by request.
Workshop schedule:
The workshops are free and open to to all, but registration is required.  Please register via the Research Commons Workshops page.
For further information or questions, contact the dhil@sfu.ca

Type in Multiple Dimensions: A Lecture and Films by Judith Poirier

Alcuin event with Judith PoirierThe Alcuin Society is pleased to present a free public lecture on March 16, 2017 with Judith Poirier. Judith will discuss the book as a space for design experimentation, and show her experimental films using type and historic printing elements.

Thursday, March 16, 2017
7:00 pm
SFU Harbour Centre
515 W. Hastings St.
Fletcher Challenge Room

Admission free and open to the public. No registration required.

Judith Poirier is a professor of typography & editorial design at École de design, Université du Québec à Montréal (UQAM), Montréal, Québec. She is also a filmmaker, and a multiple Alcuin award winner for her own books.

This is a unique opportunity to hear her in Vancouver, for anyone interested in type or book making. Judith is one of three judges for the Society’s 35th upcoming competition, the 2016 Alcuin Awards for Excellence in Book Design in Canada.

See the Alcuin Society’s post, and more information about Judith here | Visit Judith’s website and her Vimeo page.