News & Events

Copyediting Position at BC Pension Corporation

COPY EDITOR

Temporary Assignment – Up to Three Months

 

Branch:  Plan and Member Communication Job Type:  Temporary full-time
Classification:  Communications Officer R14 Union/Excluded:  BCGEU
Salary Range:  $45,431 to $51,491 per annum Security Screening:  Yes
Competition:  PC17: Additional:  Funding for relocation will not be provided.
Closing Date:  

 

Geographically Restricted:  Funding for relocation will not be provided.

BC Pension Corporation is one of the largest professional pension services organizations in Canada. Doing meaningful work and with a challenging mandate, we provide comprehensive pension services to five BC public sector pension plans. In addition, the corporation is executing on a forward-thinking, transformational strategy that will change the way we serve plan members and employers. Our strategic plan, From 12 to 21, is an ambitious program of business transformation that supports high service levels and cost-effective delivery through better use of technology, improved business process and continued attention to staff training and development. It’s the ideal setting for a consultative team player who thrives in a collegial, results-oriented client service delivery environment.

Reporting to the Manager, Communications, the Copy Editor edits and proofs communication products to ensure clarity and standardization. Communication products can be complex, controversial and sensitive in nature. The potential for content to be miscommunicated may have a negative impact on the Pension Corporation and exacerbate sensitive circumstances and cause embarrassment to the Corporation. The Copy Editor provides feedback to the writer on all aspects of the written product. The position must establish strong relationships with all levels of staff across the Corporation. 

Selection Criteria:

  • Diploma in a related field such as communications or journalism or an equivalent combination of related education, training and experience.
  • A minimum of two years’ editing and proof reading or related experience which encompasses multiple communication channels and products suitable for the level of the position.
  • Experience using computer applications including MS Office, Excel, Outlook, Adobe and in internet researching.
  • Experience with the Chicago Manual of Style.

Your resume must provide detailed information about your education and employment history in order to clearly demonstrate how you meet the required job qualifications as listed in the selection criteria above. Please ensure your resume includes the month and year(s) for each job in your employment history as well as the job related responsibilities.

Lesser qualified applicants may be appointed at a lower level.  An eligibility list may be established. Testing may be required.  

Only applicants selected to move forward in the recruitment process will be contacted to move to the next stage (at-home written assessment and/or an interview).  All candidates are notified of the outcome of the competition once it has been completed.

To apply:

Please apply through our career websitehttps://bcpensioncorp.prevueaps.ca/jobs/

 Contact: Human Resources

                Email: Jobs@pensionsbc.ca

PDF available: Copy Editor JD


Pandoc version 2.0 released

Pandoc, the amazingly versatile document production and conversion toolkit, has now been released in version 2.0. Lead developer John MacFarlane describes the move to v2 as “a major architectural change;” and also that “with each release, pandoc becomes more a team effort.”

A quick browse through the release notes shows a lot of practical improvements and new features. In addition to its already robust handling of plaintext, markdown, html, Word .docx, LibreOffice .odt, InDesign .icml, and epub2/epub3 formats, the new release has a number of new features that publishers and developers should check out. I’ll quote just a tiny bit of the release notes document: Read more


housepress at 20: A talk by Calgary poet & publisher Derek Beaulieu

SFU Library is pleased to invite you to a noon-hour talk by Derek Beaulieu in Special Collections at the Burnaby campus.

The Calgary-based author of numerous books of poetry, conceptual fiction, and criticism has also been active for two decades as a literary publisher with his acclaimed micro-press housepress (1997-2004) and its successor, no press (2005-present).

His talk will focus on this aspect of his literary work — the poet as publisher.

12:30 – 1:30, Thursday October 26
Special Collections & Rare Books, Room 7100, W.A.C. Bennett Library (at SFU Burnaby)
For more information, email Tony Power (power@sfu.ca)

International Open Access Week events

International Open Access Week  (October 23-29, 2017) is a global, community-driven week of action to open up access to research. This year’s theme is an invitation to answer the question of what concrete benefits can be realized by making scholarly outputs openly available. “Open in order to…” serves as a prompt to move beyond talking about openness in itself and focus on what openness enables; then to take action to realize these benefits. Open in order to increase the impact of my scholarship. Open in order to enable more equitable participation in research. Open in order to improve public health. These are just a few examples of how this question can be answered.

 

Join SFU Library during Open Access Week 2017 for a series of events focused on examining the role of the open movement within and beyond the academy.

 

Events are open to all and free, but seating is limited and registration is required. For more information and to register, visit: http://tiny.cc/sfu-oa-week

 

Featured events

 

Tension and Risk in Open Scholarship: A Conversation (October 26, 6:00pm-8:00pm – BCIT Vancouver Campus)
Please join BCIT, SFU and UBC in celebrating International Open Access Week for a panel that examines the threads running through different tensions in the open movements, including: Indigenous and Traditional Knowledge, ethics and privacy, student-faculty relationships, accessibility and inclusivity, and researcher-institution relationships.

 

In this panel, Dr. Hannah McGregor and Dr. Raymond Siemens discuss how the Digital Humanities can bring academic and non-academic communities together to be more inclusive, accessible, and accountable.

 

Workshops

 

Share Data / Find Data (October 25, 1:30pm-3:00pm)

Digital Humanities Innovation Lab – Fall 2017 Update

Get in touch with DHIL
Learn more about the activities of DHIL through our website: http://www.lib.sfu.ca/dhil.  The site profiles current projects, provides information and registration for lab events, and details the ways the lab can support researchers.
The website also links to the DHIL consultation request form. Researchers are welcome to submit a consultation request for any campus and during regular service hours (9am-5pm, M-F).  In addition to bookable consultations, the lab also holds office hours on Thursday mornings (10am-11am) in Burnaby and at least once a month in Vancouver (times and locations vary).  Updated office hours and locations can be found on the Contact Us page of the website.
If you would like to be added to the mailing list for future DHIL news and events, please contact dhil@sfu.ca
Propose a digital research project
DHIL accepts project proposals twice a year. The deadline for proposing Spring/Summer projects is January 15, 2018.  Information about proposing a project is found on the Work with DHIL page of the website. Please be in touch if you have any questions about the proposal process or are seeking feedback on a potential project.
DH Café : Digital Pedagogy 
The DH Café presents a series of short introductory workshops and informal discussion on topics relevant to the basic theories and methods behind digital research in the humanities. The courses cover a broad range of topics, from larger issues in digital research in the academy to specific tools and research techniques. The DH Café theme for Fall 2017 is Digital Pedagogy. Join us throughout the fall in exploring the use of digital technologies in teaching and learning.
Workshop schedule:
September 18, 10:30am-1pm, Bennett Library 7010
Presented by: Dr. Juan Pablo Alperin, Publishing@SFU
October 4, 1pm-2:30pm, Bennett Library 7010
Presented by: John Born, Shantala Singh, Duane Woods, Gabe Wong, Jason Toal (SFU Teaching & Learning Centre)
November 1, 1pm-2:30pm, Bennett Library 7010
Presented by: Kevin Stranack & Ali Moore (SFU Library Digital Publishing)
In addition to the DH Café workshops, the DHIL is proud to share the first workshop in our 2017-2018 DH Skills workshop series focused on the process of managing research data in the Arts, Humanities and Social Sciences.  This workshop will be of particular interest to those preparing grant applications in the near future.
September 21, 1:30pm-3:30pm, Bennett Library 7010
Presented by: SFU Library Data Services
KEY, SFU’s Big Data Initiative Events
KEY, SFU’s Big Data Initiative, will be hosting a number of lectures this fall, including the Data Visionaries Series. We would like to highlight two events that may be of particular interest to researchers working in the area of digital scholarship:
Speaker: Dr. Constance Crompton, Assistant Professor of Communication, University of Ottawa
September 20, 2017 – 12:30 to 1:30pm
SFU’s Big Data Hub, Presentation Studio, ASB 10900
Suspense: towards a Digital Narratology 
Speaker:  Dr. Mark Algee-Hewitt, Director of the Stanford Literary Lab and Assistant Professor of Digital Humanities and English at Stanford University
September 22, 2017 – 2:45pm-4:00pm
SFU’s Big Data Hub, Presentation Studio, ASB 10900
What is the relationship between the feeling of anticipation we get from reading certain novels, and the words of the text itself? Is it the narrative of the story, the desire to know what happens next? Or is it something more subtle, a set of literary devices and effects, that makes us feel suspense? Combining cognitive psychology and deep learning models, this project explores the ways that fiction works to create the conditions of possibility for the experience of suspense. In addition to offering a new way to understand what suspense is and how it operates on readers, this project also offers a model of the new turn towards reading in the Digital Humanities. Far from the straightforward analysis of form, authorship, or topic, in this project, we explore what our new quantitative methods can tell us about the evolution of the reading experience and how we make sense out of what we read.

Quill & Quire Omni and the bi-weekly email newsletter

SFU Library now has a subscription to Quill & Quire Omni, the online news service for book trade professionals in Canada. The site is updated frequently with current industry news.

Quill & Quire Omni also sends out a twice-weekly email newsletter with excerpts of the latest industry news. Faculty, staff, and graduate students in Publishing can contact Adena Brons (abrons@sfu.ca), the liaison librarian for Publishing to be added to the email list.

Please note that this subscription DOES NOT include access to the Digital Edition of the Quill & Quire magazine. The Library has print subscriptions to Quill & Quire at Belzberg Library downtown.

 

 


The Inaugural Jim Douglas Lecture: Marion Sinclair of Publishing Scotland

In September 2016, the great British Columbia publisher James Jardine Douglas passed away in North Vancouver. Jim Douglas — known perhaps most famously as the “Douglas” in Douglas & McIntyre — was one of the most influential and inspirational figures in BC publishing. A number of key publishing firms in BC — including D&M, Raincoast Books, Ampersand & Co — trace their lineage in one way or another to Jim Douglas. And a great many people in the BC industry have known, worked with, and been encouraged by Jim. The Publishing Program at SFU owes an enormous debt to Jim, as he contributed so much of his time, wisdom, and indeed money to the establishment of our program and the encouragement of our students and faculty.

To recognize Jim’s great contributions to the BC publishing industry, we are pleased to announce the Jim Douglas Lecture, an annual event which aims to bring the local publishing community together and to highlight issues of importance.

The first Jim Douglas Lecture will be held on Wednesday, September 20th at 7pm, at SFU Harbour Centre (rm 1400).

Our inaugural speaker is Marion Sinclair, currently Chief Executive of Publishing Scotland and with 28 years experience in the Scottish publishing industry. Ms Sinclair will speak to us about “Scottish Publishing Today and its Place in the World,” a subject with very clear parallels in Canadian independent publishing.

We hope you will join us on the evening of September 20th, to honour Jim’s memory, and to meet our very distinguished guest.

For more about Jim Douglas, BC Booklook published an excellent remembrance:

For more about Marion Sinclair’s Publishing Scotland, see http://www.publishingscotland.org/

For additional information or to reserve a seat, please email: pubworks@sfu.ca

 

 


Ralph Hancox Memorial Scholarship

Ralph Hancox – Writer and journalist, Man of letters, bibliophile, publisher, Nieman Fellow, photographer, pilot, father, husband, grandfather and great grandfather. Born in England 23 August 1929; died Victoria, BC 22 March 2017. Intered Catarqui, August 18, 2017.

 

A scholarship fund for students in the Master of Publishing Program will be established to honour Ralph’s commitment to the publishing industry and his dedication to his students at Simon Fraser University’s Master in Publishing Program. The purpose of the scholarship will be to support a master’s student education recognizing that Ralph valued education, writing and a wondering mind and his students who demonstrated these qualities.

Ralph joined  the SFU staff and worked as Adjunct Professor in the late 1990’s. He worked with Anne Cowan-Buitenhuis and Rowland Lorimer in the newly established  Master of Publishing Program. Ralph served as Adjunct Professor and Professional Fellow Emeritus at Simon Fraser University where he published a textbook on ‘Managing the Publishing Process’ for the Canadian Centre for Studies in Publishing.  There, he was honoured with the Chancellor’s Award for Distinguished Service for 10 years of teaching before he retired again at the age of 80, in 2009.

More about a scholarship fund in Ralph’s honour

  • To donate, see http://bit.ly/RalphHancoxFund (tax receipt available from SFU)
  • If we raise $4500 – Annual graduate bursaries, scholarships or awards can be created for $1,500 per year, with a minimum three-year commitment.
  • If we raise $25 K+ – we can establish a graduate scholarship in perpetuity in Ralph’s name for ~$500 /per year for every $25 K invested.

Ralph attended the School of Modern Languages, Regent Street Polytechnic in London, where he mastered Pitman shorthand, a prerequisite skill for his early career in journalism. He arrived in Canada in 1955 with his new bride, newborn daughter, and a vintage German Olympia typewriter in hand. His exceptional typing skills of 125 wpm, his sharp and inquisitive mind were tools that launched an iconic career in journalism that spanned 54 years on the Canadian publishing landscape.

In 1965, Ralph won a Nieman Fellowship recognizing excellence in Canadian editorial writing at the Peterborough Examiner and attended Harvard’s Nieman Foundation for Journalism. Later he joined Harvard’s Program for Management Development at the School of Business.

Ralph started his career as a pilot in the Royal Air Force, training in Rhodesia, at the tender age of 17. He described the experience of flying the Tiger Moth, Harvard, and the first RAF jet, the Gloster Meteor as “hurtling through the air in a tin can with a ton of metal strapped to his backside.” He flew in the Berlin Airlift in 1948, and later as a journalist covered the building of the Berlin Wall. In 1961, he traveled via the underground from East to West Berlin through the Wall under the conditions that he would not report on his experience.

In Canada he started his career in journalism writing obituaries for the Kingston Whig Standard.

In 1965, Ralph won a Nieman Fellowship recognizing excellence in Canadian editorial writing at the Peterborough Examiner and attended Harvard’s Nieman Foundation for Journalism. Later he joined Harvard’s Program for Management Development as part of the PMD 26 cohort at the School of Business.

After a career as Editor-in-Chief at the Peterborough Examiner as a colleague of Robertson Davies, he joined the Reader’s Digest where he worked for 32 years. Ralph ended his first career, serving the last 16 years as Chairman, President, and CEO of Reader’s’ Digest Canada and Consigliere delegato and chairman of Reader’s Digest Italy. Post retirement he served as Adjunct Professor and Professional Fellow Emeritus at Simon Fraser University where he published a textbook on ‘Managing the Publishing Process’ for the Canadian Centre for Studies in Publishing.  There, he was honoured with the Chancellor’s Award for Distinguished Service for 10 years of teaching before he retired again at the age of 80, in 2009.

With his wife Peg, Ralph (aka Hank) lived a life post-World War II in Canada pursuing family and career dreams in Kingston, Peterborough, Boston, New York, Montreal, Milan, Vancouver, and Victoria, with summers in the Kawarthas and weekends of leisure in Vermont. A storyteller at heart, he regaled generations of family and students with lessons he learned from his rich life experiences. “Good judgment comes from experience and experience comes from poor judgement” he would say, quoting his mother.

He was a man of letters in the classic sense: fountain pen, elegant italic script to paper. He kept a daily journal for over 53 years. He engaged in written repartees, Olympian literary gymnastics with family and friends, including long time Peterborough friend and librarian, Bob Porter.

He was not an ordinary man. Robert Frost’s words “I had a lover’s quarrel with the world” describes the restless soul, the intimate relationships, the daily inner tensions, his ability to question and think deeply and at the same time embrace his life. His mind never rested as he explored life and the meaning of existence, to the day he died.

Ralph leaves behind 4 appreciative children, their spouses and families who live with gratitude across Canada.

Remembering Ralph by Rowland Lorimer

Simon Fraser’s obituary for Ralph


And the Cultural Appropriation Prize Goes to…White Writers

“Asking historically marginalized groups to do the emotional and social labor of fixing systems and structures to benefit white people is the height of arrogance, colonialism, and white supremacy. And in the instances when they’ve done the labor, they still don’t often reap the benefits of it. Editors never needed to publicly fund a pot of money for cultural appropriation—it has been funded all along.”

Read more of this article, written by Ebonye Gussine Wilkins, here.

 


Digital Humanities Innovation Lab: Summer 2017 Workshops

The DHIL is pleased to bring our DH Skills workshop series back for the summer semester with three workshops: Intro to Preparing Character Data in R, Data Management Planning with SSHRC in mind, and Tableau for Humanists (the Tableau workshop will cover the same information as our previous Spring 2017 offering). The workshops are free and open to to all, but registration is required.  See below for more details.

Intro to Preparing Character Data in R

June 29, 2017

10am-1pm

SFU Burnaby (Bennett Library, Rm 7010, Research Commons)

Registration: http://www.lib.sfu.ca/help/publish/dh/dhil/32391

In this workshop, we will focus on importing to R and preparing data for subsequent analysis. We will also learn how to organize files into a working directory and use scripts to replicate our work. Students will learn the different types of data-structures supported within R, different file extensions compatible with R, and some of the caveats of working with real-world text files. At the conclusion of the workshop students will be able to import text documents, strip metadata from texts embedded within larger data files, convert words to lower case, and separate words from full-line character strings. No R experience is necessary to participate in this workshop.

Note: Please bring your own laptop with the latest version of R and RStudio installed.

Data Management Planning with SSHRC in mind

July 11, 2017

10:30am-12:30pm

SFU Burnaby (Bennett Library, Rm 7010, Research Commons)

Registration: http://www.lib.sfu.ca/help/publish/dh/dhil/data-management-planning-sshrc-mind

Since the Tri-Agencies released their Statement of Principles on Digital Data Management, there have many questions about researcher responsibilities for data management and data sharing. This hands-on workshop will guide participants through the research data lifecycle and data management planning using DMP Assistant, an online data management tool.  We will also explore avenues for data deposit including SFU’s Research Data Repository, Radar.

Tableau for Humanists

July 21, 2017

10:30am-1:30pm

SFU Vancouver (Harbour Centre, Room 1505)

Registration: http://www.lib.sfu.ca/help/publish/dh/dhil/tableau-humanists

How do humanists visualize their data? In this workshop you will be introduced to a variety of visualizations of humanities’ data created in Tableau, one of the world’s leading software packages. After a demonstration of how researchers use Tableau, participants will be offered hands-on instruction in how to use Tableau to create a range of visualizations, including interactive displays. In the last half hour, participants will  be given free time, to experiment their own visualizations and to consult with the instructors about their own data visualizations.

Note: Please bring your own, fully charged laptop with the latest version of Tableau or Tableau Public installed.

Don’t know who we are yet? Learn more about the the Digital Humanities Innovation Lab through our website: http://www.lib.sfu.ca/dhil. The site profiles current projects, provides information and registration for lab events, and details the ways the lab can support researchers.

If you have a project or an idea and are wondering how the lab can help, you can book a consultation through the website with a DHIL consultation request form. The lab also holds office hours on Tuesday mornings (10am-11am) in Burnaby (Room 724, Bennett Library) and at least once a month in Vancouver (times and locations vary). Updated office hours and locations can be found on the Contact Us page of the website.