Library & Research

Digital Humanities Innovation Lab: Summer 2017 Workshops

The DHIL is pleased to bring our DH Skills workshop series back for the summer semester with three workshops: Intro to Preparing Character Data in R, Data Management Planning with SSHRC in mind, and Tableau for Humanists (the Tableau workshop will cover the same information as our previous Spring 2017 offering). The workshops are free and open to to all, but registration is required.  See below for more details.

Intro to Preparing Character Data in R

June 29, 2017

10am-1pm

SFU Burnaby (Bennett Library, Rm 7010, Research Commons)

Registration: http://www.lib.sfu.ca/help/publish/dh/dhil/32391

In this workshop, we will focus on importing to R and preparing data for subsequent analysis. We will also learn how to organize files into a working directory and use scripts to replicate our work. Students will learn the different types of data-structures supported within R, different file extensions compatible with R, and some of the caveats of working with real-world text files. At the conclusion of the workshop students will be able to import text documents, strip metadata from texts embedded within larger data files, convert words to lower case, and separate words from full-line character strings. No R experience is necessary to participate in this workshop.

Note: Please bring your own laptop with the latest version of R and RStudio installed.

Data Management Planning with SSHRC in mind

July 11, 2017

10:30am-12:30pm

SFU Burnaby (Bennett Library, Rm 7010, Research Commons)

Registration: http://www.lib.sfu.ca/help/publish/dh/dhil/data-management-planning-sshrc-mind

Since the Tri-Agencies released their Statement of Principles on Digital Data Management, there have many questions about researcher responsibilities for data management and data sharing. This hands-on workshop will guide participants through the research data lifecycle and data management planning using DMP Assistant, an online data management tool.  We will also explore avenues for data deposit including SFU’s Research Data Repository, Radar.

Tableau for Humanists

July 21, 2017

10:30am-1:30pm

SFU Vancouver (Harbour Centre, Room 1505)

Registration: http://www.lib.sfu.ca/help/publish/dh/dhil/tableau-humanists

How do humanists visualize their data? In this workshop you will be introduced to a variety of visualizations of humanities’ data created in Tableau, one of the world’s leading software packages. After a demonstration of how researchers use Tableau, participants will be offered hands-on instruction in how to use Tableau to create a range of visualizations, including interactive displays. In the last half hour, participants will  be given free time, to experiment their own visualizations and to consult with the instructors about their own data visualizations.

Note: Please bring your own, fully charged laptop with the latest version of Tableau or Tableau Public installed.

Don’t know who we are yet? Learn more about the the Digital Humanities Innovation Lab through our website: http://www.lib.sfu.ca/dhil. The site profiles current projects, provides information and registration for lab events, and details the ways the lab can support researchers.

If you have a project or an idea and are wondering how the lab can help, you can book a consultation through the website with a DHIL consultation request form. The lab also holds office hours on Tuesday mornings (10am-11am) in Burnaby (Room 724, Bennett Library) and at least once a month in Vancouver (times and locations vary). Updated office hours and locations can be found on the Contact Us page of the website.


16th International Conference on Books, Publishing & Libraries, University of Pennsylvania, 7 July 2018

Call for Papers

We are pleased to announce the Call for Papers for the Sixteenth International Conference on Books, Publishing & Libraries, held 7 July 2018 at the University of Pennsylvania in Philadelphia, USA.

Founded in 2003, the International Conference on Books, Publishing & Libraries brings together scholars and practitioners around a common shared interest in exploring the histories, traditions, and futures of books, publishing, and libraries.

We invite proposals for paper presentations, workshops/interactive sessions, posters/exhibits, and colloquia. The conference features research addressing the annual themes.

For more information regarding the conference, use the links below to explore our conference website.

Call for Papers Themes
Presentation Types Scope and Concerns
Emerging Scholar Awards Conference History
Submit a Proposal

Submit your proposal by 3 July 2017.

We welcome the submission of proposals at any time of the year. All proposals will be reviewed within two to four weeks of submission.


Highlights of the Paul Whitney Collection of modern first editions

Currently on display outside Special Collections and Rare Books is a selection of recently arrived material from a major collection of modern literary first editions. The collection was donated to Simon Fraser University Library by the former City Librarian of Vancouver, Paul Whitney, a lifelong collector.

The Whitney donation consists chiefly of numerous in-depth collections of the works and various editions of leading modern British, Canadian, American and world writers, including Martin Amis, J.G. Ballard, William Boyd, William Burroughs, Peter Carey, Angela Carter, J.M. Coetzee, Mavis Gallant, B.S. Johnson, Malcolm Lowry, Cormac McCarthy, Ian McEwan, Alice Munro, Haruki Murakami, Rohinton Mistry, Michael Ondaatje, Carol Shields, William Vollmann, David Foster Wallace, and many others.

The collections are comprised of rare and valuable volumes and first editions, including signed and advance copies, as well as more common books.  In addition, the donation includes a smaller number of works in translation, plus in-depth collections of several leading literary and fine presses, including McSweeney’s (San Francisco), Gaspereau (Nova Scotia), and Blackfish (Vancouver).
The display will run until May 5, at Special Collections and Rare Books, Room 7100, W.A.C. Bennett Library (SFU Burnaby).


Journal collection development in the digital era

Created in the second half of the 17th Century, journals became the fastest and most convenient way of disseminating new research results, outranking correspondence and monographs. The advent of the digital era then challenged their traditional role and form. Indeed, digital technologies, which are easy to update, reuse, access, and transmit, have changed how researchers produce and disseminate knowledge, as well as how this knowledge is accessed, used, and cited. It also changed how libraries subscribe to scholarly content.

Drawing on historical and contemporary empirical data, this talk will address the past and current transformations of scholarly communication, with an emphasis on the role of journals in this new ecosystem, and present the results of the first large-scale analysis of journal usage in Canada.

About the speaker

Vincent Larivière holds the Canada Research Chair on the Transformations of Scholarly Communication at the Université de Montréal, where he is associate professor of information science. He is also scientific director of the Érudit journal platform, associate scientific director of the Observatoire des sciences et des technologies (OST) and regular member of the Centre interuniversitaire de recherche sur la science et la technologie (CIRST).

Vincent holds a bachelor’s in Science, Technology and Society (UQAM), a master’s degree in history of science (UQAM) and a Ph.D. in information science (McGill), for which he received the 2009 Eugene Garfield Dissertation Scholarship award.

April 10, 3pm-4:30pm at the Halpern Centre, room 126 (SFU Burnaby)

Please RSVP to library@sfu.ca

Sponsored by KEY, SFU’s Big Data Initiative, and SFU Library

Special reading with Liz Howard, Griffin Award-winning poet

Liz Howard’s Infinite Citizen of the Shaking Tent won the 2016 Griffin Poetry Prize, the first time the prize has been awarded to a debut collection. It was also a finalist for the 2015 Governor General’s Award for Poetry and received an honourable mention for the Alanna Bondar Memorial Book Prize.

Born and raised in northern Ontario, Howard is of Anishinaabe and Franco-Ontarian descent. She received an Honours Bachelor of Science with High Distinction from the University of Toronto, and an MFA in Creative Writing through the University of Guelph. She now lives in Toronto where she assists with neurocognitive aging research.

Liz Howard will be reading in Special Collections & Rare Books (SFU Burnaby) on Friday, March 24th, 2017 from 12:30 – 1:30 pm. Attendance is free and refreshments will be served.

Special Collections is located in room 7100 on the 7th floor of the W.A.C. Bennett Library, Simon Fraser University, 8888 University Drive, Burnaby.


Open Education Week 2017 — The Failure of Access: Rethinking Open Education

In celebration of Open Education Week 2017, Simon Fraser University is honoured to be collaborating with the University of British Columbia, BCcampus, Public Knowledge Project, and British Columbia Research Libraries Group to host a discussion on The Failure of Access: Rethinking Open Education.

Please join us on Tuesday, March 28th at SFU Harbour Centre (515 West Hastings Street, Vancouver, BC) from 5:30pm-8:30pm. This event is open to all and free, but seating is limited and registration is required.

The Failure of Access: Rethinking Open Education

The use of open re-use licenses and Internet technologies have long promised to reduce barriers to education by making it more distributed, equitable, and open. Indeed, the promise of open education can trace its roots to the the Universal Declaration of Human Rights, adopted by the United Nations 1948, which states “everyone has a right to education.” There is little formal evidence, however, that open education has an impact on increasing access to learning or making education more equitable.

This event will explore the goals, failures, and successes of open education. Join us in exploring such questions as: is open education succeeding in being a transformative movement that makes learning more accessible? What are the criteria and successes that should be used to measure if the open education movement is a success? What more needs to be done?

Our discussion will be led by keynote speaker Dr. Ishan Abeywardena (Advisor – Open Education Resources) from the Commonwealth of Learning and panelists from SFU, UBC, CAPER-BC, and SPARC.

Panelists include: Juan Pablo Alperin, Assistant Professor at the Canadian Institute for Studies in Publishing and the Associate Faculty Director of Research with the Public Knowledge Project at Simon Fraser University; Tara Robertson, Accessibility Librarian, CAPER-BC; Jenna Omassi, Strategic Support Advisor, VP Students’ Office at UBC; and moderator Brady Yano, Assistant Director of Open Education, SPARC.

For more information, including full speaker bios and to register, please visit: http://www.lib.sfu.ca/about/branches-depts/rc/32099


Introducing the Digital Humanities Café

The DH Café presents a series of short introductory workshops and informal discussion on topics relevant to the basic theories and methods behind digital research in the humanities. The courses cover a broad range of topics, from larger issues in digital research in the academy to specific tools and research techniques.
The DH Café is a partnership between the Digital Humanities Innovation Lab (DHIL) and SFU Library’s Research Commons. The DH Café is also affiliated with KEY, SFU’s Big Data Initiative.
Beginning March 1st and running until April 5th, the DH Café will meet Wednesday afternoons from 3pm – 4pm, alternating between SFU Burnaby and SFU Vancouver (see individual workshops to confirm location).  Workshops can be hosted at other locations by request.
Workshop schedule:
The workshops are free and open to to all, but registration is required.  Please register via the Research Commons Workshops page.
For further information or questions, contact the dhil@sfu.ca

Print Culture Speakers Series—Slow Print: William Morris and Socialist Print Culture

Dr. Elizabeth C. Miller will be presenting her talk “Slow Print: William Morris and Socialist Print Culture” in Special Collections and Rare Books on Friday, February 10, as part of the Print Culture Speakers Series. Dr. Miller’s talk will reference items from the Library’s Robert Coupe Collection of works by and about William Morris.

This talk situates William Morris within a flourishing, late-nineteenth-century radical print culture that Miller terms “slow print” due to its purposeful rejection of the strategies of mass print production. While Morris’s work as editor for the Socialist League’s newspaper Commonweal in the 1880s has sometimes been considered at odds with his founding of the Kelmscott Press in the 1890s, the two print adventures are united by a shared goal to reclaim the means of print production from a newly consolidated late-Victorian mass print industry.

Simon Fraser University’s outstanding Morris collection, inclusive of radical ephemera as well as Kelmscott volumes and other examples of fine printing, will be on display in conjunction with the talk so the audience can examine the works for themselves.

• • •

Dr. Elizabeth Miller is professor of English at the University of California at Davis. She is the author of numerous articles and essays on Victorian print culture, radical politics in 19th century England, Oscar Wilde, Alfred, Lord Tennyson, and more recently ecocriticism and Victorian studies. Dr. Miller’s first book, Framed: The New Woman Criminal in British Culture at the Fin de Siècle (University of Michigan, 2008) examined late Victorian crime narratives to understand the figure of the glamorous New Woman criminal.

In Slow Print: Literary Radicalism and Late Victorian Print Culture (Stanford, 2013), Miller explored Britain’s radical press from 1880-1910; Slow Print won the award for best book of the year from the North American Victorian Studies Association and was an honorable mention for the 2014 Modernist Studies Association best book prize. Her newest work is on ecology and capital in 19th century British literature and culture.

This talk will take place on Friday, February 10, 2017 from 2:30 pm – 4:00 pm at W.A.C. Bennett Library [SFU Burnaby], Special Collections and Rare Books, Room 7100.

Free event, no registration required.


Robert R. Reid Exhibition & Curators Talk at SFU Library

SFU Special Collections and Rare Books is pleased to announce the Robert R. Reid: “Allied Arts” Affirmative exhibition produced by the CAUSA Research Curators, and located on the 3rd floor and 7th floor of the W.A.C. Bennett Library (SFU Burnaby) from January–March 2017.

A fifth generation Canadian (b.1927), Robert R. Reid, at age 14, taught himself to operate a ‘hand press’ –so as to channel his absorbing interest in the practicalities of letterpress printing. His subsequent association with architects, landscape designers, poets, graphic artists (and editors for magazines and journals) has become emblematic of a post-WWII ‘Allied Arts’ Movement in Canada. In 1962, he became the first ‘design practitioner’ to be awarded a Canada Council Visual Arts Award.

DATE CHANGED: Join SFU Library on Monday, March 20, 2017, 12:30 to 2:30 pm for a curators talk and reception in Special Collections, Room 7100, W.A.C. Bennett Library. Please email Melanie Hardbattle to RSVP.

The Robert R. Reid: “Allied Arts” Affirmative exhibition presents an assemblage of documents generated between 1949 and 2017. Components of the present exhibition will be intermittently replaced (and/or rearranged), in order to maximize the scope of an exploratory curatorial initiative.


Join poets Stephen Collis & Juliane Okot Bitek for a lunchtime reading

Join SFU Library for a lunchtime poetry reading in Special Collections on Thursday, January 26, 2017.
12:30–1:30pm
Room 7100, 7th floor of the W.A.C. Bennett Library, SFU Burnaby, BC.

Stephen Collis’s most recent, and seventh, book of poetry is Once in Blockadia (Talonbooks 2016). Currently he is visiting and writing about poet Phyllis Webb. He lives on Coast Salish Territories and teaches poetry at Simon Fraser University.

Juliane Okot Bitek was born in Kenya to Ugandan exiles and now lives in Vancouver. A teacher and UBC doctoral candidate in Interdisciplinary Studies, she is also an essayist and poet whose work has been anthologized and published widely in literary magazines, online and in print. Her powerful and critically praised book of poems responding to the Rwandan genocide, 100 Days, was recently published by University of Alberta Press.