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And the Cultural Appropriation Prize Goes to…White Writers

“Asking historically marginalized groups to do the emotional and social labor of fixing systems and structures to benefit white people is the height of arrogance, colonialism, and white supremacy. And in the instances when they’ve done the labor, they still don’t often reap the benefits of it. Editors never needed to publicly fund a pot of money for cultural appropriation—it has been funded all along.”

Read more of this article, written by Ebonye Gussine Wilkins, here.

 


Digital Humanities Innovation Lab: Summer 2017 Workshops

The DHIL is pleased to bring our DH Skills workshop series back for the summer semester with three workshops: Intro to Preparing Character Data in R, Data Management Planning with SSHRC in mind, and Tableau for Humanists (the Tableau workshop will cover the same information as our previous Spring 2017 offering). The workshops are free and open to to all, but registration is required.  See below for more details.

Intro to Preparing Character Data in R

June 29, 2017

10am-1pm

SFU Burnaby (Bennett Library, Rm 7010, Research Commons)

Registration: http://www.lib.sfu.ca/help/publish/dh/dhil/32391

In this workshop, we will focus on importing to R and preparing data for subsequent analysis. We will also learn how to organize files into a working directory and use scripts to replicate our work. Students will learn the different types of data-structures supported within R, different file extensions compatible with R, and some of the caveats of working with real-world text files. At the conclusion of the workshop students will be able to import text documents, strip metadata from texts embedded within larger data files, convert words to lower case, and separate words from full-line character strings. No R experience is necessary to participate in this workshop.

Note: Please bring your own laptop with the latest version of R and RStudio installed.

Data Management Planning with SSHRC in mind

July 11, 2017

10:30am-12:30pm

SFU Burnaby (Bennett Library, Rm 7010, Research Commons)

Registration: http://www.lib.sfu.ca/help/publish/dh/dhil/data-management-planning-sshrc-mind

Since the Tri-Agencies released their Statement of Principles on Digital Data Management, there have many questions about researcher responsibilities for data management and data sharing. This hands-on workshop will guide participants through the research data lifecycle and data management planning using DMP Assistant, an online data management tool.  We will also explore avenues for data deposit including SFU’s Research Data Repository, Radar.

Tableau for Humanists

July 21, 2017

10:30am-1:30pm

SFU Vancouver (Harbour Centre, Room 1505)

Registration: http://www.lib.sfu.ca/help/publish/dh/dhil/tableau-humanists

How do humanists visualize their data? In this workshop you will be introduced to a variety of visualizations of humanities’ data created in Tableau, one of the world’s leading software packages. After a demonstration of how researchers use Tableau, participants will be offered hands-on instruction in how to use Tableau to create a range of visualizations, including interactive displays. In the last half hour, participants will  be given free time, to experiment their own visualizations and to consult with the instructors about their own data visualizations.

Note: Please bring your own, fully charged laptop with the latest version of Tableau or Tableau Public installed.

Don’t know who we are yet? Learn more about the the Digital Humanities Innovation Lab through our website: http://www.lib.sfu.ca/dhil. The site profiles current projects, provides information and registration for lab events, and details the ways the lab can support researchers.

If you have a project or an idea and are wondering how the lab can help, you can book a consultation through the website with a DHIL consultation request form. The lab also holds office hours on Tuesday mornings (10am-11am) in Burnaby (Room 724, Bennett Library) and at least once a month in Vancouver (times and locations vary). Updated office hours and locations can be found on the Contact Us page of the website.



5×15 – Indian Summer Festival 2017

Publishing@SFU is thrilled to support the fabulous Indian Summer Festival (July 6–15, 2017) again this year! We’re happy to present 5×15/Constellations at The Vogue on the evening of July 15th.

Here’s the details:

 

Indian Summer Festival’s Closing Night: 5 x 15 & Constellations

Saturday July 15, 2017

The Vogue, 918 Granville St., Vancouver, BC V6Z 1L2
Doors at 7pm, Show at 7:30pm
Tickets: $35+
Buy Now: https://www.indiansummerfest.ca/event/closing-night-5-x-15-constellations/

5×15 VANCOUVER

Five Speakers, Fifteen Minutes. Magic.

Indian Summer Festival’s Closing Night kicks off at 7:30pm with our favourite speaker series, 5×15, followed by Constellations featuring a mix of musical delights from 9:30pm onwards. This ticket includes both events for an entire evening of cultural feasting.

If 5×15’s packed soirees feel like an evening of offline, communal surfing, it’s due to the eclectic menu of speakers.’ – The New York Times

PRESENTED BY: PUBLISHING @ SFU

5×15 is a speakers’ series that originated in London and has since spread to New York and Milan. It features five stellar speakers, speaking for fifteen minutes each on a topic they are deeply passionate about. The only rules: the talk should be unscripted, and fifteen minutes long. 5×15 has hosted speakers such as Gloria Steinem, Ben Okri, Brian Eno, Malcolm Gladwell, Eve Ensler and Ahdaf Soueif. For the past three years, Indian Summer Festival has hosted the only Canadian iteration of 5×15.

Our all-star lineup of speakers:

  • Talvin Singh is a tabla player, electronic musician, DJ and music theorist known for his pioneering work in the Asian Underground scene in London. He is an inspiration to many across the globe.
  • Kamila Shamsie grew up in Karachi and now lives in London. She is the author of five award-winning novels, trustee of English PEN, and named one of Granta’s ‘Best of Young British Novelists’
  • Rock star, writer and humanitarian Bif Naked has pushed the boundaries of acceptability in her screaming loud creative work making her a cultural icon and a true Canadian legend.
  • Graphic artist Molly Crabapple has drawn in Guantánamo Bay, Abu Dhabi’s migrant labor camps and with rebels in Syria. Her work is in the permanent collection of the Museum of Modern Art.
  • Former revolutionary Carmen Rodriguez  is a Chilean-Canadian author, poet, educator and political social activist. She is currently the writer-in-residence at the historic Joy Kogawa House.

The evening is hosted by the brilliant comedian Kalyani Pandya, described as “Ottawa’s funniest Dyke”.

 

7:00pm: Doors Open

7:30pm: 5×15

9:30pm: Constellations

ASL is available for 5×15! Please email outreach@indiansummerfest.ca to request ASL services before June 23rd. For venue description and accessibility information: Vogue Theatre

 

5 x 15

 


16th International Conference on Books, Publishing & Libraries, University of Pennsylvania, 7 July 2018

Call for Papers

We are pleased to announce the Call for Papers for the Sixteenth International Conference on Books, Publishing & Libraries, held 7 July 2018 at the University of Pennsylvania in Philadelphia, USA.

Founded in 2003, the International Conference on Books, Publishing & Libraries brings together scholars and practitioners around a common shared interest in exploring the histories, traditions, and futures of books, publishing, and libraries.

We invite proposals for paper presentations, workshops/interactive sessions, posters/exhibits, and colloquia. The conference features research addressing the annual themes.

For more information regarding the conference, use the links below to explore our conference website.

Call for Papers Themes
Presentation Types Scope and Concerns
Emerging Scholar Awards Conference History
Submit a Proposal

Submit your proposal by 3 July 2017.

We welcome the submission of proposals at any time of the year. All proposals will be reviewed within two to four weeks of submission.



Canada’s Greatest Storytellers: 1867 to 2017

A special Sesquicentennial show celebrating our finest Fiction Writers

With the help of superb author portraits by Anthony Jenkins appearing on-screen, publisher and author Doug Gibson roams the stage talking about our finest authors down through the years. Decade by decade, he chooses our best authors, English and French, and selects their very best books.

Each decade begins with a burst of Canadian music from the time. Then a contemporary photo reminds us of the historical setting, and a series of iconic works of art remind us of the wider artistic scene in which our writers worked. The result is a celebration not only of our writers and storytellers, but of our artists in general. The resulting reading list is now in great demand, and will be distributed at the show.

Already he has given this hugely ambitious show (with an Intermission when we reach 1967, the year when Gibson himself came to Canada) in the nation’s capital, Ottawa, and at the Toronto Launch in the Lieutenant Governor’s Chambers in Queen’s Park. After this Vancouver Launch, he will be taking the show across Canada for the rest of 2017, as his own tribute to our country and its writers, culminating in his praise of his author, Alice Munro.

WHERE   Vancouver, at Simon Fraser University’s Harbour Centre, Room 1400

WHEN      Wednesday, May 31, at 7pm

BOOK       Free tickets at pubworks@sfu.ca

 


VPL seeks graphic novelist for next Writer-in-Residence

Vancouver Public Library is looking to host a resident graphic novelist between Aug. 28 and Dec.15, 2017.

The Writer in Residence will develop exciting public programs and provide advice to emerging writers through one-to-one consultations and group workshops, as well as outreach to targeted communities.

The deadline is May 22. Email programs@vpl.ca for more information.


Remembering Ralph Hancox

by Rowland Lorimer

British-born Canadian, Ralph Hancox, a pilot, reporter, Studebaker Silver Hawk owner, editor, publisher, CEO, adjunct professor and professional fellow, teacher, Nieman Fellow, Harvard Management Development Program participant, and fiction and nonfiction book author, has shuffled off his mortal coil and lives on in the fond memories of his former students and colleagues in Simon Fraser University’s Publishing program. He was predeceased by his wife, Margaret (Peg), and is survived by his four children and their families.

As Ralph was nearing retirement from Reader’s Digest, his daughter Alison happened to hear a 1990s CBC radio interview of Ann Cowan-Buitenhuis, who was talking about a new Master of Publishing program at Simon Fraser University that she co-founded with me in 1995. Alison’s view was that such a program would be perfect for her father’s post-retirement career, based on his abiding interest in teaching and education.

Ann and I met with Ralph at his club on a cold, wet night in Montreal. I can still recall fearing for my well-being as we hurtled down the highway in Ralph’s Mercedes station wagon, into a darkness peppered with pelting rain and snow. The purpose of our meeting was to tell Ralph about the program. The result of the meeting was his expression of interest–an expression that led to Ralph’s later suggestion that we submit a proposal for support to the Reader’s Digest Foundation (Canada), which had been created to allow Reader’s Digest Canada to act in conformity with Canadian ownership regulations in Canada’s magazine industry. Previous to this, the foundation had assisted journalism programs, some of the graduates of which, Ralph noted, led such a concerted anti-Reader’s Digest lobby that the company had set aside a permanent office for federal auditors to review its books to ensure that Reader’s Digest Canada was not feeding funds back to its US parent company.

Ann and I welcomed the opportunity, given that we kept claiming that our proposal had the support of industry. Ironically, while that support was real, it was verbal and we walked away empty-handed from pitches to the profitable sectors of the industry. These included educational book publishers, larger Canadian and foreign-owned book publishers (one of which helped us later), and magazine publishers such as Maclean-Hunter (later sold to Roger’s). As Chair of the Reader’s Digest Foundation (Canada), Ralph delivered support of a sufficient amount that the university found itself looking more kindly on the idea of approving the establishment of its first professional social science and humanities-based professional program. As luck would have it, I was able to advise both sides on the conditions of the support, and thereby ensure that the resources the program needed were wisely allocated.

Fast forward to the program’s establishment and its staffing, and we decided that, after due diligence, we would take Ralph up on his offer to teach the publishing management course in the program without compensation. While Ann and I were willing to accept such a personal gift, the university wisely found funds to pay Ralph a token salary.

I did have misgivings about Ralph’s teaching. A major issue was that while Ralph insisted on teaching management techniques, many of our students had never held down a serious job. What utterly convinced me of Ralph’s value to the students was the increasing number of graduating Project Reports that applied Ralph’s framework to the operations in which they participated during their internships. As I read through these reports, I became familiar with the framework, and realized that other faculty members, including me, needed to up our game in providing students with tools that emphasized different frameworks for gaining insight into publishing practice.

In his years with the MPub at Simon Fraser, my colleagues and I got to know Ralph as a gracious and generous man who truly did love teaching. Each year he became more effective in his ability to convince the mainly English-major “candidates,” as he called our students, of the value of his application of process management. As a side effect, I acquired an increased sophistication in my understanding of management, and was particularly interested in hearing the other side of the Reader’s Digest Canada story. I learned how, for instance, constrained by foreign ownership regulations, Reader’s Digest Canada became a training ground for company executives placed around the world. Part of that process led to Ralph’s sojourn in Milan to get the Italian operation back on its feet.

Ralph’s retirement from teaching at 80 created quite a problem for the program. We attempted to recruit business profs. They were only interested in discussing research that critically analyzed general management practice, and might or might not have some relevance to publishing practice. We tried MBA profs, but none of them had any idea what happened within a publishing company. We tried other publishers, but they fell back on war stories. Finally, we turned to one of our graduates who had a business background and had been taught by the master himself. That worked. But then that graduate married a classmate, had a family, and moved to his wife’s hometown, Ottawa. Following that, we arranged for a New York publishing consultant to commute and teach what turned out to be business practice for publishers. That also worked out well in that our students learned lots from him, but they missed out on Ralph’s management framework. All during this time, we would bring Ralph back in an attempt to supplement the shortcomings of others. It worked to some degree, but his absence took its toll.

In Ralph’s second retirement he turned to his first love, writing. Encouraged by one of his sons to dust off a book manuscript for which he had an offer to publish to 1959, he published three books of fiction–one of which demonstrated the ability to write a whole novel using only conversation. He told me that he had to stop watching television because the tension it induced propelled his heart into arrhythmia. Writing was calmer. And of course, for a few years, he chaired his strata council, no doubt with aplomb.

Simon Fraser’s MPub benefitted greatly from Ralph Hancox. He helped to elevate the program to a truly graduate program. As a teacher; as a former executive who had been opened to management theory through his management development training and Nieman Fellowship at Harvard; as an old-school gentleman and grammarian; and as an enjoyable personage, we were all enriched. He was much loved by his students and colleagues. Like us all, however, he was mortal.


An MPubber’s Experience at eBook Craft and Tech Forum, or, What I Learned at Nerd Camp

by Jessica Riches

It’s been about a month since eBook Craft and Tech Forum, and even that is not enough time for me to have absorbed all the information the conference offered. If further evidence were required to show the sheer volume, consider that I have found myself writing a 1000+ word blog post just to begin describing it. I’ve broken it up into three parts, one for each day, but I only have one thing to say, ultimately: if you’re looking to educate yourself on ebooks and data, this conference is the absolute best place to do it.

Day One: Diving into #eprdctn

I started at base camp with the workshop day. The group was small, not even a third of what the final day would draw, but the sessions were focused on how to simplify and further the work of making ebooks. I learned about document object models, troubleshooting pagination, incorporating Javascript into ebooks, and building book apps the absolute for-dummies way. Questions swirled in my brain: Why is pagination hard to get right? How might I introduce interactivity into an ebook? How do loops work?

My highlight of the day was a rousingly polite discussion on the future of ebook standards led by Dave Cramer. Intended as a stitch-and-bitch session, it manifested with all of the stitching (literally: knitting needles were present) and none of the bitching. I found it both enlightening and refreshingly similar to what we do all the time in the MPub program: talk about problems, brainstorm solutions, extrapolate on trends to try to imagine where things are going. It was also an eye-opening example of how smart the conference attendees really are.

Day Two: The Bigger Picture of #eprdctn

The second day was decidedly less cozy, and the space expanded to accommodate the #eprdctn masses. Accessibility was a hot topic throughout the day, with various speakers weighing in. I learned about the issue from the perspectives of ebook reading apps, librarians, accessibility groups, and production people, and their combined weight went a long way to convincing me that, like ebook production itself, accessibility is not a fringe problem; it belongs at the centre of any conversation about contemporary publishing. It can be a tricky discussion for an industry that often relies on various types of privilege, but if I learned one thing from this conference, it’s that accessibility is not just a question of morality—it’s also a question of efficiency affecting the entire supply chain (and also morality). If we’re going to do something, like make an ebook, let’s just do it right the first time, no?

And again Dave Cramer rose as the eBook Craft conference all-star, at least as far as I’m concerned. He gave a fascinating and thoroughly understandable talk breaking down the process of digital-rights-management encryption. It was riddled with Moby Dick references, which probably went a long way towards comforting the book crowd during the math-heavy parts, and it was paced so perfectly that it would have been hard to avoid becoming absorbed. Not that I wanted to. It was, as I say, fascinating.

Day Three: I Love (Lieutenant-Commander) Data

Free datanerd cookiesI began the third day, the Tech Forum day, very poorly indeed. A Toronto transit meltdown resulted in me missing Noah Genner’s breakdown of BookNet data—and that, let me tell you, is a real tragedy for someone who identifies strongly as a <datanerd>. Fortunately, I was met by swag, and from that moment, I knew that Tech Forum would be the best day yet. Cookies, pins, free books: I am eminently bribable.

The free stuff was only the first sign of the great things to come, though. The second was the schedule card, which told me that, at any given point during the day, I was going to have to choose between three different sessions. High stakes, indeed.

The decision was tough, but I can speak very highly of the sessions I did attend. My favourite—of the whole conference, in fact—was Erica Leeman’s investigation of Amazon keywords. Erica, in addition to being an all-around delightful human being, is a librarian-turned-publisher who embodied a spirit of systematic inquiry that I found inspiring. By carefully and deliberately altering metadata, she was able to find a (partial) answer to the perennial question of book publishing: but what is Amazon really up to? The results were both unsurprising and somewhat irrational, but at least now we know that—news flash!—Amazon can’t always be trusted to make sense.

The conference closed with a couple of high-powered speakers, Nathan Maharaj of Kobo and Robert Wheaton of Penguin Random House, whose respective keynote talks on understanding book buyers and facing the challenges of a changing media landscape spoke to two of the most pressing issues in today’s publishing world. The presentations were, truthfully, quite reminiscent of things said at SFU’s Emerging Leaders summit, and not only because the speakers hailed from the same companies. Rather, they mirrored the kind of long-sighted, big-picture approach to publishing that the MPub program excels at. They made for a fitting close to a conference that started with hands-on learning.

Summing Up

This was an incredible conference, and I was so lucky to have the opportunity to attend it. It may have been a lot of information, but it was worth every exhausted brain cell. The balance of practical and theoretical concerns was perfect and the cookie game? That was definitely on point.

To future MPubbers: you should really, absolutely, definitely apply to go. As wonderful as our program is—and after to speaking to several graduates of other publishing programs, I feel ready to assert that our program is, in fact, the best one (#unbiasedopinion)—there is no better place than this conference to learn about ebooks and things that computers can help with. There is certainly no better place to get inspired by the people who do these things every day.

BookNet’s conference isn’t just for the nerds. It’s for anyone who has ever questioned the role that digital technologies can play, now and in the future.

My Top Five Sessions to See:

  1. Demystifying the Inner Workings of Amazon Keywords, Erica Leeman
  2. Beyond Good and Evil: The Nuts and Bolts of DRM, Dave Cramer
  3. The End of Broadcast Media and Publishing’s Hidden Radicalism, Robert Wheaton
  4. How I Built an Automated Ebook Production Platform—and You Can, Too!, Nellie McKesson
  5. Bionic Bookselling, Nathan Maharaj