Digital Humanities Innovation Lab – Fall 2017 Update

Get in touch with DHIL
Learn more about the activities of DHIL through our website: http://www.lib.sfu.ca/dhil.  The site profiles current projects, provides information and registration for lab events, and details the ways the lab can support researchers.
The website also links to the DHIL consultation request form. Researchers are welcome to submit a consultation request for any campus and during regular service hours (9am-5pm, M-F).  In addition to bookable consultations, the lab also holds office hours on Thursday mornings (10am-11am) in Burnaby and at least once a month in Vancouver (times and locations vary).  Updated office hours and locations can be found on the Contact Us page of the website.
If you would like to be added to the mailing list for future DHIL news and events, please contact dhil@sfu.ca
Propose a digital research project
DHIL accepts project proposals twice a year. The deadline for proposing Spring/Summer projects is January 15, 2018.  Information about proposing a project is found on the Work with DHIL page of the website. Please be in touch if you have any questions about the proposal process or are seeking feedback on a potential project.
DH Café : Digital Pedagogy 
The DH Café presents a series of short introductory workshops and informal discussion on topics relevant to the basic theories and methods behind digital research in the humanities. The courses cover a broad range of topics, from larger issues in digital research in the academy to specific tools and research techniques. The DH Café theme for Fall 2017 is Digital Pedagogy. Join us throughout the fall in exploring the use of digital technologies in teaching and learning.
Workshop schedule:
September 18, 10:30am-1pm, Bennett Library 7010
Presented by: Dr. Juan Pablo Alperin, Publishing@SFU
October 4, 1pm-2:30pm, Bennett Library 7010
Presented by: John Born, Shantala Singh, Duane Woods, Gabe Wong, Jason Toal (SFU Teaching & Learning Centre)
November 1, 1pm-2:30pm, Bennett Library 7010
Presented by: Kevin Stranack & Ali Moore (SFU Library Digital Publishing)
In addition to the DH Café workshops, the DHIL is proud to share the first workshop in our 2017-2018 DH Skills workshop series focused on the process of managing research data in the Arts, Humanities and Social Sciences.  This workshop will be of particular interest to those preparing grant applications in the near future.
September 21, 1:30pm-3:30pm, Bennett Library 7010
Presented by: SFU Library Data Services
KEY, SFU’s Big Data Initiative Events
KEY, SFU’s Big Data Initiative, will be hosting a number of lectures this fall, including the Data Visionaries Series. We would like to highlight two events that may be of particular interest to researchers working in the area of digital scholarship:
Speaker: Dr. Constance Crompton, Assistant Professor of Communication, University of Ottawa
September 20, 2017 – 12:30 to 1:30pm
SFU’s Big Data Hub, Presentation Studio, ASB 10900
Suspense: towards a Digital Narratology 
Speaker:  Dr. Mark Algee-Hewitt, Director of the Stanford Literary Lab and Assistant Professor of Digital Humanities and English at Stanford University
September 22, 2017 – 2:45pm-4:00pm
SFU’s Big Data Hub, Presentation Studio, ASB 10900
What is the relationship between the feeling of anticipation we get from reading certain novels, and the words of the text itself? Is it the narrative of the story, the desire to know what happens next? Or is it something more subtle, a set of literary devices and effects, that makes us feel suspense? Combining cognitive psychology and deep learning models, this project explores the ways that fiction works to create the conditions of possibility for the experience of suspense. In addition to offering a new way to understand what suspense is and how it operates on readers, this project also offers a model of the new turn towards reading in the Digital Humanities. Far from the straightforward analysis of form, authorship, or topic, in this project, we explore what our new quantitative methods can tell us about the evolution of the reading experience and how we make sense out of what we read.