John Maxwell

 

John MaxwellJohn Maxwell‘s research & teaching focus is on the impact of digital technologies in the cultural sector (and particularly books and magazines), the history of digital media, and the emergence of digital genres and mythologies.

John has been working in the Internet and new media since the early 1990s. His professional background includes web development, content management, electronic publishing, SGML & XML, learning technologies, and virtual communities. John was a member of the first Master of Publishing cohort at SFU in 1995/96.

After working on educational technology at the BC’s Open Learning Agency through the late 1990s, he completed a PhD in Education at the University of British Columbia where his research focused on the cultural history of personal and educational computing at Xerox PARC in the 1970s.

John has taught digital media to publishing students at SFU since 2001. He leads the two tech-oriented courses in the Master of Publishing program (PUB 802 and PUB 607), an undergraduate seminar on the future of the book (PUB 401), and directs Digital Strategy workshops for the SFU Publishing Workshops.

John’s current R&D work includes an emerging set of web-based tools for supporting book & magazine workflows in editorial and production (see http://tkbr.ccsp.sfu.ca:5001), and historical research on digital innovation at Toronto’s Coach House Press in the 1970s (see http://publishing.sfu.ca/2013/09/coach-house-retrotech/)

John is almost a BC native (he was born east of the Rockies but has lived on the coast most of his life). He’s married with a couple of kids and more than a couple of cats. On Twitter: @jmaxsfu

Director and Associate Professor
John Maxwell, BA, MPub, PhD (UBC)

Teaching
PUB 802: Technology & the Evolving Forms of Publishing
PUB 607: Publishing Technology Project
PUB 401: Technology and the Evolving Book
Digital Strategy: SFU Publishing Workshops

Research Interests
Technology, Digital Media, Web Development, Content Management, SGML & XML

Selected Publications